Hours

  • Monday: 9:00am - 5:00pm
  • Tuesday: 9:00am - 7:00pm
  • Wednesday: 9:00am - 5:00pm
  • Thursday: 9:00am - 7:00pm
  • Friday: 9:00am - 5:00pm
  • Saturday: 9:00am - 12:00pm
  • Sunday: Closed

headspace

Glenroy

2A Hartington Street, Glenroy, Victoria 3046
P: (03) 9304 1011 F: (03) 9304 1033

headspace Glenroy is a health service specifically for young people aged 12 to 25, their families and friends. We provide a range of health and wellbeing services just for young people!

At headspace Glenroy, we're all about making sure that young people receive the best support and care so as they can continue to lead rich and meaningful lives.

You can come to headspace Glenroy if you need some support or advice about your physical health; have issues or difficulties with something in your life; need help finding employment; are worried about your mental health or the mental health of a friend; are using drugs and alcohol and want to chat about this, or are going through a tough time and don't know who to chat to.

We also have a range of groups and programs that are open to all young people aged 12 to 25. All groups are free, fun and enable young people to meet other like minded young people whilst learning  valuable skills for looking after their mental and physical well being.

Services available

Mental Health Services

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Mental health workers – which may include psychologists, psychiatrists, counsellors and other workers – that can help if you're just not feeling yourself.

Doctor (GP)

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GPs can help with any physical health issues as well as issues related to sexual health, drug or alcohol use, relationship problems or feeling down or upset. Your centre may have a GP on site or links to one locally. 

Sexual Health Services

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Sexual health screenings on site or links to local services. 

Alcohol & Drug Services

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Workers either on site or linked to the centre who can assist you with any alcohol or other drug issue. 

Work & Study Services

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Workers either on site or linked to the centre who can assist you with work or study opportunities. 

Youth Reference Group

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A group of young people who help with events and some decision making at a centre. Ask your centre about getting involved.

Youth Programs

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Centres have a range of programs and activities for young people. Just ask your centre what they have on. 

More information

Meet Terri our new IPS Supported Employment Worker (Click to show below) (Click to hide below)

 

Terri IPS

 We asked Terri a bit about herself and this is what she said...

“Tell us a bit about yourself, and our background?"

I have worked for 17 years in employment support, and have been privileged to have worked in some very specialised roles such as juvenille justice, homelessness and community welfare. I am a Youth Worker, and studied this when I was 28 years old and next year I hope to commence a postgraduate degree in Vocational Studies, which I am very excited about. I am super passionate about working with young people, and I kind of fell into Vocational Support after working in various different jobs.

 

 “Why are you so passionate about helping young people to find employment?"

When I was 19, I was unemployed for nearly two years and I ended up running the SAVE Australian Youth Rally. It was a really crazy time. We took to the streets of Melbourne with Brooms, in an effort to show the government at the time that as young people, we were willing to do whatever it took to gain meaningful employment... even sweep!! So I have my own personal experience of being unemployed, which adds to my passion and the empathy I feel for young people struggling to find work.  Young people are very special and I feel in our culture we don't embrace young people enough! It is empowering as a young person to be heard and to have a voice. I have done alot of Volunteering with young people  and am very passionate about doing what I can to support young people to live meaningful lives. Helping them to find a job they love when they're going through a tough time, is one of the ways in which I can do this!

 

"What do you hope to achieve in your new job at headspace?"

I hope to support all young people to gain meaningful employment! I also want to help young people to build the confidence they need to find a job that fits their interests and suits where they are at in their recovery. 

"So what's your favourite food?"

Vietnamese Take away for sure! It's my favourite. But I also love my mum's home style cooking. And any dessert! I LOVE food!

"What is one fun fact about you?"

I make my own jewelry and still have all my jewelry from the 80s!

 

 

 

 

 

Meet Doctor Sarah! Worlds best GP (Click to show below) (Click to hide below)

Doctor Sarah is our Queer friendly Doctor, and according to some, she is the world's best GP!

Sarah B

 

 

 

Dr Sarah is available Tuesday and Wednesday for appointments and she can help with a range of mental and physical health concerns.

If you would like to know more about Dr Sarah and how you can book an appointment to see her, please phone Angie, Saron, Monisha or Sindi at the centre on (03) 9304 1011. 

If you are wanting to make a referral for a young person, please contact us and ask to speak with a member of the Access Team on the phone number above. 

 

 

Service Providers: how to refer a young person (Click to show below) (Click to hide below)

 

IPS 3

 

 

 How do I make a referral?

If you wish to refer a young person and they are under 16, we do encourage you to discuss the referral with their parents and friends prior to contacting us.

Please phone us on (03) 9304 1011 and ask to speak with a member of our Access Team about a new referral. 

Please DO NOT use the info-headspaceglenroy@orygen.org.au email address to make a referral on behalf of a young person. It is important that we speak with you directly and that sensitive information is NOT disclosed about a young persons circumstances in an email message. 

When you make this initial call, it is ideal to have the young person with you to expedite the process. Occasionally we will need to take your details and call you back at a more suitable time, we will endeavor to return your call as soon as possible. 

You can also encourage the young person to call us, drop in or invite their parents and friends to call on their behalf, before dropping in to the centre it is best to call first in order to make sure someone is available to chat with you. 

Please note headspace Glenroy is NOT an emergency service. If a young person is in need of urgent support or medical attention please call 000, lifeline on 13 11 14 or Kids Helpline on 1800 55 1800.

The following link provides a Victorian list, by geographical area of mental health support services, please consult if you are seeking localised support. 

 

 What to consider when referring

1. What are the young person's main concerns?

2. What other organisations and supports are already in place for the young person?

 

What can a young person expect at their first appointment?

Young people are offered an initial assessment with an Access Clinician. The initial appointment will take the form of an informal meet and greet and will vary depending on the young person's circumstances. The main purpose of this initial session is to ascertain whether headspace is the most suitable service to support the young person. We may link the young person in with a more appropriate service if we deem that we are not best equipped to provide them with the care they require.  

 

What happens next?

We will discuss the young persons circumstances as a team and decide how best to provide them with the support they need. The Access Team Clinician will keep in touch with the young person until they are linked in with either headspace or a more suitable service. Sometimes we will require additional information in order to make the most informed choice about the young person's care, in which case we will attempt to make contact with you, or the young person's family and friends. 

 Please note: We will confirm most appointments by SMS two days prior and invite the young person to respond with a yes or no. If the young person is not able to attend, we require 24 hours cancellation notice. We encourage young people to confirm their appointments as soon as possible so as we can best accommodate all young people that seek support from our service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

for families and friends of young people (Click to show below) (Click to hide below)

 

 

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Changes in young people

Young people will experience many physical and emotional changes as they grow up.

As a parent or friend it can be challenging to raise sensitive issues and to talk about your concerns if you notice that someone doesn't quite seem themselves. 

Sometimes it can be hard to know the difference between normal moodiness and irritability and an emerging mental health problem.

If you are concerned about a young person, be it a friend or family member, it is important to know what to look our for and how to best support them to get the help they need.

 

Good Mental Health vs Mental Health Problem

At headspace we tend to think of good mental health as being able to work and study to your full potential, cope well with day to day stress, be involved in ones community and live life in a free and satisfying way.

 

There are a number of factors that impact negatively on our mental wellbeing these include and are not limited to:

  • Homelessness
  • Family Breakdowns
  • Alcohol and Drug use
  • Physical health problems, such as chronic fatigue, glandular fever, obesity and diabetes
  • Death of a loved one(including animals)
  • Bullying
  • Relationship Problems

 

Sometimes we feel as though we can take action to improve how we feel, and at other times hard as we try, we just can’t seem to feel better. The difference between a small hiccup and a mental health problem is when we face a small hiccup, we can generally employ some of our self care strategies, and in a short amount of time we notice an improvement in our mood and general sense of wellbeing. When we start to find that self-care strategies aren’t really  working, and that nothing that used to make us feel better seems to be pulling us out of our funk, we can start to acknowledge this as potentially the beginning of a mental health problem, or something that we may need a bit of help from others for.

Clinical staff such as Psychologists and Doctors generally tend to think of a mental health problem as a range of significant symptoms or patterns of behaviour that negatively impact on a persons capacity to live a rich and meaningful life.  These symptoms generally last for an extensive period of time, and as mentioned previously, they can’t be shaken by simply walking in the park or playing with our dog or cat. Mental health problems will often require medical or psychological intervention, and in some cases (not all) will require a young person to take medication or undergo intensive treatment. 

241 headspace photo library expiry Jan 2020

 

 Warning Signs

There are a few signs to be mindful of when judging whether you feel a young person

may be beginning to experience a mental health problem.

When any of these warning signs are persistent and remain for a few weeks to a month it is important to support your

friend or child to seek support for their wellbeing.

  • Changes in appetite or sleeping patterns
  • Being easily irritated or angry for no obvious reason
  • Loss of interest in friendships and activities they would normally enjoy
  • Expressing negative, distressing or concerning thoughts
  • Seeming unusually worried, anxious or stressed for no apparent reason
  • Significant difficulty concentrating
  • Significant increase in risk taking behaviour , such as taking alcohol, drugs or risky sexual activity

How to help a young person to get the help they need

 

Simon Rice is a research fellow at Orygen, The National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental Health, when asked about why he feels that fathers or other significant males in a young man’s life find it challenging to talk to their sons, friends or students about their mental health and wellbeing, this is what he had to suggest.

 

In any work with men, and young men in particular, it’s really important to be aware of not letting stereotypes impact too much. On a population level, young men aren’t as good at seeking mental health support as are young women, but this doesn’t ring true for all young men. Some are great at seeking help. Same goes for relationships between fathers and sons. There are some that have genuine and supportive relationships, and are able to be open about challenging topics like mental health. There are others who find this more difficult. By and large, men are socialised in a particular way and for some, this socialisation experience can make talking about emotions unfamiliar, strange, or uncomfortable. If this is coupled with limited knowledge of factors that promote positive mental health and wellbeing (and what to do if a loved one needs professional mental health support), then these kinds of conversations can be even more tricky.

 

Do you have any tips for men that might be concerned about the wellbeing of a young man in their life? How might they go about starting those difficult conversations?

 

It’s not a one size fits all solution. What I would say is that if you have a feeling that a young male in your life isn’t travelling well then you should trust that feeling. For some young men, a direct conversation about what you’ve noticed might be a fine approach, for others it will seem threatening or invasive. Something action-based strategies might help, like a chat while kicking the footy together, or talking a bit over a couple of games of pool. It might take time tough, so you may need to be patient. Trust, and feeling comfortable talking about heavy things can sometimes be a real issue for young fellas, and this might need to be built up over an extended period of time. Using humour (but making sure you’re careful not to be insensitive or insulting) can be a really good way to diffuse tension. Most of all, letting them know you’re there for them now, and in the future, is really important.

Simon Rice

 

 It can be difficult to have conversations with young people when you are concerned about their wellbeing.

It is much better to attempt to have a conversation that may prove uncomfortable, than to avoid doing anything out of fear of upsetting that young person.

Some tips for having challenging conversations may include:

  • Taking openly and honestly 
  • Ask the young person what they might need from you and reassure them that you are available to chat or support them to seek help
  • Avoid forcing or pushing the young person to share information or to seek support
  • Show empathy and listen without judgement
  • Keep communication open and avoid blaming or judgmental language
  • Support them to explore options for help and advice (check out eheadspace.org.au) and support them in making that first contact
  • If you are worried about suicide or the potential for the young person to harm themselves or someone else, ask direct questions, such as "have you thought about ending your life?"
  • Remember to look after yourself. Talk to people you trust about your concerns and seek professional support if you feel you would benefit from having someone to chat to
  • Let the person you know you care for them- this is likely to matter to them very much and reassure them that you want the best for them and are not attempting to coerce them into chatting to a health professional

As a parent or friend watching a young person going through a tough time, it can be very challenging and impact on your own mental and physical wellbeing, it's important to look after yourself  so as you can best support your loved one.

 

David is a father of a young person who recently received support at headspace, he had this advice for fathers who are concerned about their young person.

Don’t think of it (attending a mental health service like headspace) as labeling, there is that stigma… that going to places like this will label you as a bad parent or the child as a nut case, it’s not about that, it’s about having someone to talk to.

It’s the basis of our civilisation and services like this, help establish and promote that level of communication.  It’s a fundamental requirement, when you don’t have the time or energy, places like this do. They provide that energy that you can grow from. I would recommend it to anyone!

If everyone could have a month or two from headspace, to give their kids a chance to have an outlet and likewise have their parents know that there are services like this available. You guys are stretched as it is, but I would highly recommend it, it can’t do any harm! There is no shame in talking about what’s going on with experienced people who can provide good feedback! All kids get now days is stuff form the internet and school grounds, and none of that is good. If they google help it comes up with all sorts of dire things. So having someone with a positive outlook makes the world of difference!! 

 

 

There are a number of places you can seek advice and support for yourself and to ask curly questions about a friend or family member you might be concerned about

eheadspace.org.au provides online and telephone support to young people, their families and friends. You can talk one on one with a qualified mental health professional either over the phone or through an online web chat.

Kids Helpline provides support to friends of young people aged 5 to 25. If you are worried about a friend, you can access a web chat, phone line or email address in order ot chat to someone about your concerns

Parentline Victoria provides a state-wide telephone counselling service to parents and carers of children aged from birth to eighteen years

1800RESPECT is a national sexual assault, domestic & family violence counselling service that can provide information and refer you to support services that can help.

Family relationship centre provides all families (whether together or separated) with access to information about family relationship issues, ranging from building better relationships to conflict resolution.

Relationships Victoria is committed to providing high quality and comprehensive services that assist families and children to overcome challenges, grow and thrive.

The Bouverie Centre work with families, more specifically families affected by alcohol and other drugs, gambling and mental health, to help them strengthen relationships and resolve problems standing in the way of their well-being.

headspace Australia has some great resources for families and friends, including videos and fact sheets (check out you tube clip below)

 

 

 

If you are seeking individual support, and would like to chat to a mental health professional one one one, headspace can support friends and partners of young people that are aged 12-25 with  counselling support  you can call headpsace Glenroy on (03) 9304 1011 for more information.

If you are a parent or family member or friend and worried about a young person and would like to support them with a referral to headspace Glenroy, please call us on 9304 1011 to chat to an Access Clinician about your concerns. Before making contact with headspace Glenroy about a young person you are worried about, we encourage you to chat to that young person and seek their consent before doing so.

When a young person comes to headspace Glenroy, they can speak to one of our incredible Access Team members, such as Adrian.

We asked him about whether a young man has to sit in a room an talk to a mental health professional, this is what he had to offer;

Generally we invite young people into a room to have a chat, however there have been many times where I have taken young people for a walk or played board games whilst chatting about their situation. Personally, I think it’s important to normalise mental health difficulties such as anxiety, anger and depression. I let the young person know that many people experience these difficulties, however they can learn to manage them well with a bit of support from a place like headspace.

Adrian

 

 What can a young person expect at their first appointment?

Young people are offered an initial assessment with an Access Clinician. The initial appointment will take the form of an informal meet and greet and will vary depending on the young person's circumstances. The main purpose of this initial session is to ascertain whether headspace is the most suitable service to support the young person. We may link the young person in with a more appropriate service if we deem that we are not best equipped to provide them with the care they require.  

 What happens next?

We will discuss the young persons circumstances as a team and decide how best to provide them with the support they need. The Access Team Clinician will keep in touch with the young person until they are linked in with either headspace or a more suitable service. Sometimes we will require additional information in order to make the most informed choice about the young person's care, in which case we will attempt to make contact with you.

Cancellation Policy 

Due to high demand for appointments here at headspace Glenroy, it's really important that young people do their best to attend at the time made for them, or that they give us as much notice as possible, should they not be able to make it.

This ensures that all young people are able to be seen by a headspace staff member as soon as possible.

We will confirm most appointments by SMS two days prior and invite the young person to respond with a yes or no. If the young person is not able to attend, we require 24 hours notice of their cancellation. We encourage young people to confirm their appointments as soon as possible so as we can best accommodate all young people that seek support from our service.

 If you are over the age of 25, you may like to look at the Australian Psychological Society's website for a list of Psychologists in your area that may be able to offer support. You can also visit your local GP for support with obtaining a Mental Care Plan or talking about your concerns.