eheadspace Group Chat
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Group Chat
Support for International Students
March 5th 2019 @ 7pm AEDT
Managing work, study and life activities can be tough, particularly when you are new to the Australian culture and the various services. If you are an international student, no matter what type of study you are doing, whether you are here for a few months or a few years, ensuring you are aware of services available to you is important to feel equipped and ready to take on the year!
Jo eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 8:22 pm
Hi everyone and welcome to another group chat and thanks for logging onto our chat tonight. My name is Jo and I’m one of the mental health clinicians here at eheadspace, really looking forward to chatting to you all and discussing what support is out there for international students to access!

Moving to a new country to study and adjusting to a new culture can be very stressful and a BIG transition for anyone to make. It’s also important to know that international students face unique mental health stresses and it can be easy to concentrate on your studies and forget about taking care of yourself.

With very few support networks, language barriers and pressures from home, international students face many challenges and these challenges can all greatly impact on their mental health leaving them to feel unsettled and anxious. Which is why we're here tonight to discuss what supports are out there for international students to access here in Australia. Hopefully you find this a helpful group chat!
Mallika eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 7:01 pm
Hey everyone, my name is Mal :) Excited to answer your questions tonight!
Lil eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 7:01 pm
Welcome to tonight's eheadspace group chat everyone!
Katherine eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 7:01 pm
Welcome everyone! I'm Katherine, a clinician here at eheadspace. Thank you for joining us for our group web chat tonight!
Please don’t hesitate to ask us anything, this is your space! We encourage you to share your experiences and advice with other international students too.
Rob eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 7:01 pm
Hello I'm Rob, looking forward to answering some questions tonight!
Katherine eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 8:23 pm
As usual a couple of things before we start:
  • When you submit your question it won't appear straight away
  • Our team will be busy reading and preparing an answer to your question before it's posted live - we appreciate your patience!
  • If we can't publish anything we'll let you know (in a private message)
  • It’s really helpful if you can identify yourself with your name, or an alias, as it means we can more easily recognise any follow up comments from you guys and make sure we’re answering the right person.
Lil eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 7:05 pm
While we start to write responses to your questions, here is some information we prepared earlier on tonight's subject...
Jo eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 8:24 pm
We recognise that feeling lonely and isolated; feeling disconnected from the community; feeling stressed and experiencing pressure from your family in your home country; experiencing financial hardship or housing/accommodation issues; experiencing harassment or discrimination; feeling home sick, anxious or depressed and feeling confused by the institutions policy and procedures are some of the difficulties that may occur.

There’s a lot to cover but we hope to share some information and advice regarding these difficulties and hear from others who have perhaps experienced a similar concern and how they managed it.
Lil eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 7:22 pm
Jo eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 7:22 pm
So who are international students? Well we have a lot of international students in Australia from many countries. Students who consider themselves international, may be completing their secondary education, or are enrolled in a university or another tertiary institution – they may be a ‘full degree student’ here to complete their whole degree (bachelor or masters, for example), or, on exchange/study abroad for one or two semesters. International students may be sponsored by their government to complete their studies in Australia or are supported by their family back home. There are a lot of different types of international students. We recognise that on top of concerns and barriers encountered by all students (oh those pesky assessments for example!), additional difficulties often arise for international students. We hope to discuss some of these challenges, share some information and advice and hear from others who have experienced similar concerns!
Katherine eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 7:22 pm
Jo eheadspace
Moderator
12 Mar. 1:10 pm
Culture Shock
Students who are a long way from home may experience cultural shock resulting from being immersed in a culture very different to their own. You may be dealing with an unfamiliar place, a different climate, new accommodation and new accommodation. Also, cultural norms, values and beliefs may be different and sometimes some people may feel socially, culturally or racially excluded in the new environment.

Culture shock is the feeling of disorientation and loneliness that you may feel when moving to a new place and being in a new environment. It’s very common to experience culture shock, it may last a few days or longer. You may feel nervous, sad, lonely, overwhelmed and disconnected. These feelings can pass with time and feeling more settled. There are a few things you can do to help manage these feelings related to experiencing culture shock:

• Keep in contact with friends and family back home – trying calling, emailing or messaging.
• Talk with the staff at your education provider – they can refer you to counsellors at your institution.
• Make your room in Australia feel like home, for example, you may like to decorate your room and have some photographs of friends and family on display.
• Contact an online support service such as eheadspace (1800 650 890), grief line (1300 845 745) or beyond blue (1300 224 636).
• Try to keep yourself busy, but also give yourself time to relax.
• Remind and reassure yourself, experiencing culture shock (and feeling homesick) is normal. It is likely the intensity and frequency of these feelings will pass and you can find ways to overcome them.
• Exercise, eat well and sleep well.
• Try new things and get involved with your institution’s clubs and societies. It’s a great chance to meet new people.
Bin
Participant
5 Mar. 7:21 pm
I felt really connected to my home country, although I have just started at my university in Australia. I feel worried that I won’t settle in or fit in.
Katherine eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 7:21 pm
It can take some time to settle in to any new place Bin! There are lots of things you can do to help you feel more settled, but it’s important to remember that this is often a time with a lot of emotion, a mix of apprehension and excitement, and that’s normal and okay.
It’s great that you have a strong connection with your home country, you won’t lose that! Think of some ways to stay connected with your home country, by staying in contact with friends and family and if possible, by continuing some cultural practices, activities and interests here in Australia!
You might like to connect with people who share the same, or similar, cultural practices and interests with you. We have lots of students and people from other countries so it’s possible that there is a group or activity that you can join that connects you with people of the same or similar cultural backgrounds. Ask your institution about what groups and activities are available to you.
Reza
Participant
5 Mar. 7:21 pm
I’m an international student, is going to a headspace centre an option? :s
Mallika eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 8:26 pm
Hey Reza - That’s a good question! There are over 100 headspace centres across Australia and they each work a little bit differently. The best thing to do is to contact your local headspace centre, let them know you are international student and if you know, the health insurance you have. The headspace centre will be able to let you know if, and how, they can support you – for example, some headspace centres are able to offer you support even without a Medicare card. If the centre are not able to directly, they should be able to suggest other options local to you.

Find your nearest headspace centre here: https://headspace.org.au/headspace-centres/ You can always give your local centre a phone call or send them an email.

Also! You are welcome to chat with a clinician here at eheadspace. We can provide support and advice. We speak with young people (between 12-25 years of age) all around Australia every day of the year between 9am and 1am (we’re based in Melbourne, so that’s Victorian time!). You chat with us via a web chat, by sending us an email, or by giving us a call. You can find all the information you need to chat with us here: https://headspace.org.au/eheadspace/connect-with-a-clinician/.
Mallika eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 7:21 pm
Priya
Participant
5 Mar. 7:21 pm
Hi there I just arrived to Australia to commence my bachelors degree and I don’t understand what my overseas student health insurance covers.
Jo eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 8:27 pm
Hi there Priya, great question! When you arrive here, you are given a lot of information about a whole heaps of different things. It can feel a bit overwhelming and be confusing. It’s important to ensure you are aware of your Overseas Students Health Cover – which provider you are with and what you have access to. If you arrived in Australia on an international student visa you will have Overseas Student Health Cover – this might be with Allianz, BUPA, ahm OSCH, nib or another provider. Each provider has slightly different policies, but it is likely you are able to access the same health services and receive the same health care as Medicare (the health cover for domestic students/Australians).

First, work out what provider you are with. Here are a list of some of the health cover providers and their websites:

You can find out more on their website, or by contacting them by calling, emailing or a submitting a request online.
If you are with your institutions preferred provider, it is likely there would be a representative on campus (on scheduled days). We recommend organising a time to meet with the representative to ask any questions you may have and to ensure you are aware of what your insurance covers and what health services you can access.

If you need some more information or support about this, best place to start is the institution you’re study at!
Katherine eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 8:04 pm
Services at your University:
If you are an international student at a university or another tertiary institution, there are often a lot of supports and services available to you.
Even if you are not so sure you that you will need all of these services, we recommend you make sure you know what is available to you.
For example, see if the institution you are studying, or planning to study, at has:
• International Student Service with designated international student advisers and on arrival orientation programs and information sessions
• Language and academic support
• Counselling and psychological support
• Equity and diversity services (which can assist in addressing barriers to study including help with accessing supports in the classroom, for assignments and exams)
• a service that can support you if you feel you have been harassed or bullied
• Student Complaints
• Student Advocates/Union – academic appeals, free legal advice, financial counselling
• Career/employment support services
• a service with the ability to recommend services outside of the tertiary institution, for example, local bulk-billing doctors (GPs) and to refer you for further psychological support/counselling if needed
• Student groups including student unions, clubs and societies
• Childcare services
• Student accommodation
• Prayer and worship rooms
• Financial counselling and banking services
• Sport and fitness facilities
Lil eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 7:22 pm
Rishma
Participant
5 Mar. 7:23 pm
I feel so homesick from my home country. I really miss my friends and family back home. :(
Mallika eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 8:28 pm
Hey Rishma! It’s totally normal to feel homesick! In fact, it’s likely that at some point you will miss home… this may change from time to time in intensity. It’s important to remember that it is normal and okay to miss your life, your routine, your family and friends, and the familiarities of home.

You might like to try:

• Remind yourself that it is normal and okay to feel homesick!
• Connect to other new students – domestic or international (maybe they can share their experience of managing these feelings).
• Talk to someone about managing these feelings – your institution’s international student services, university counsellor, or a telephone support service such as: grief line (1300 845 745), eheadspace (1800 650 890) or beyond blue (1300 22 4636).
• Writing down things that you have found interesting or enjoyable in your new home here in Australia.
• Look into new opportunities (activities, meet-ups, volunteer, groups and clubs).
• Explore your new environment (find your local park or café).
• Decorate your new room!
• Make sure you’re taking care of yourself, including trying to eat and sleep enough and well.
• Stay connected with your friends and family at home (chat to them over the phone or Skype, send them messages, write emails and letters, etc.)
• Try to continue with some of the things you did at home, like cooking, religious practices, exercise, etc. - if it’s possible!
• Remind yourself that feelings change and although feeling homesick can be really tough, it’s normal and it’s likely that with some support and positive and proactive thinking and action – you can feel more settled in your new home!
Lil eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 7:23 pm
Lil eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 7:25 pm
Freja
Participant
5 Mar. 7:25 pm
I think it would be helpful to get some support and go to counselling, but my parents don’t think it would help. They don’t think mental illness is a real thing. This is a common view in my culture. Is there a way I can get counselling without my parents knowing?
Rob eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 8:32 pm
Hey Freja, sounds like getting support is really important to you at the moment, but at the same time you might be worried about your parents finding out. Mental health is viewed differently in different cultures – but it is important to look after yourself and prioritise this help when you need it. Most services such as the counsellor at your educational institution, a mental health clinician at your local headspace centre, or even a clinician on a helpline are able to provide you free or low-cost counselling support that is confidential – so your parents would not need to find out.
Most institutions have counsellors who offer international students free and confidential advice and support on person, social and academic, matters such as culture shock, feeling home sick, experiencing depression, stress or anxiety, concerns about relationships, friendships or family, accommodation problems and academic difficulties.
If you are still contemplating reaching out for counselling support, you can also take regular steps to look after yourself by doing things you enjoy and find relaxing - like having a warm bath, going for a walk, spending time with friends, reading a book, or cooking your favourite meal.
We have had a group chat on’ When mental health is understood differently in your community or culture’ – there will be some helpful information in this chat too. https://headspace.org.au/eheadspace/group-chat/when-mental-health-is-understood-differently-in-your-culture/
Lil eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 7:26 pm
Mei Ping
Participant
5 Mar. 8:33 pm
I am worried about my English as it is my second language. Will it be hard? How can I get help?
Katherine eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 7:27 pm
Thanks for your question Mei Ping.
It can be challenging to complete assessments in English when it is not your first language. Many educational institutions have Academic and English Language Skills Assistance to help you to develop your English – for conversing and for writing essays, etc. Ask your institution about what services they offer, for example, individual support or tutoring and workshops to help international students adjust to their studies and the academic requirements in Australia.
You might also find English language conversation groups that encourage local and international students to meet and practise their language skills while learning about other cultures.
It’s useful to get some support early with any questions or concerns you might have around completing your assignments. Unfortunately some students, particularly when English is their second language, have plagiarised their assessments. This can have really serious consequences which can cause more pressure and stress!
We know it can be hard to feel confident to complete assessment pieces in written English when it isn’t your first language, but there are services and supports available to assist you – so definitely check in with your teacher, student services and the supports/services available to help you with this.
Lily
Participant
5 Mar. 7:30 pm
How can I get some counselling when I don’t have a Medicare card?
Mallika eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 8:28 pm
That’s a great question – it can be a bit confusing understanding what your options are in terms of mental health support in a new country! As a first step, we would encourage you to get in touch with the counselling or psychological support team at your institution! Depending on the type of support you need, they can provide you with a certain number of free or low-cost counselling sessions. If that is not an option, or if the wait list is too long, you can contact your OSHC provider, and ask them what percentage of a session would be covered if you received counselling from a private mental health clinician. To find a mental health clinician near you, you can have a look at this link: https://www.beyondblue.org.au/get-support/find-a-professional

You can also get in touch with your local headspace centre – each centre operates differently, and some centres are able to provide you with free or low cost support even if you don’t have a Medicare card. They might also be able to recommend a low cost counselling service in the area too!
If you are look for some more immediate support, you can contact a helpline, like eheadspace, the Suicide Call Back Service, Lifeline or Kids Helpline – while they won’t be able to provide you with long term support, they can be a source of help if you are having a tough day and need to chat things through.

Getting mental health support as an international student can sometimes be tricky, but hopefully this information makes things a bit clearer!
Anima
Participant
5 Mar. 7:32 pm
It is hard to live here as an international student, most of money is spent on rent and public transport. I am under a lot of pressure to work to support myself
Katherine eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 8:29 pm
I’m sorry to hear things are difficult for you Anima. Juggling university, your social life, and work can be really tricky and it is certainly not uncommon to be struggling financially. First, we recommend you touch base with your educational institutional student services – they may be able to provide you with things like emergency food packs and public transport cards to help ease the financial pressure. They can also provide financial advice.
Here are some additional services, websites and resources to check out:
Free financial counselling
Phone: 1800 007 007
Money Smart
Government funded website with lots of tips and tools for managing money
Track My Spend phone app:
Mallika eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 8:34 pm
Also, if you are an international undergraduate student in Melbourne, you can access half-price Myki cards:
Mallika eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 8:29 pm
Adjusting to university

Adjusting to university can be tough, and even more so when it is in a new country.
When we are in a new place or an unfamiliar environment and away from our usual supports and routines, it can become difficult to adjust and to cope.

Expect to feel both ‘up’ and ‘down’ at times. On the ‘down’ side you may experience worry, confusion, sadness, loneliness, self-doubt, vulnerability and home sickness. On the ‘up’ side you may feel exhilaration, freedom, independence and excitement!

Some things that may impact on your ability to adjust to your new life/university:

• Distance from home
• Change in culture
• Expectations of the university or the location – your experience may be different than what you expected
• An increase in workload or juggling study and other commitments like work
• Not feeling connected to the environment and feeling a lack of control over the situation
• Feeling lonely or isolated
• Feeling excluded or discriminated
• Stress from home
• Personal difficulties

So, what might be helpful to adjust to life in Australia as a student? Here are some ideas:
• Allow yourself to miss home and feel homesick – it’s a normal thing and it’s totally okay!
• Stay in touch with home on a regular basis (phone, email or write letters!)
• Stay busy and be active! Try to be open about tying new activities but also hobbies and interests you did at home
• Join a group or a society at your university/school
• Decorate your room – make it feel comfortable, it’s your new home away from home!
• Give yourself time to settle in. Think of this as a tricky, but important, time to adjust and settle in.
• Don’t make any decisions too quickly, take your time to consider options before making any major decisions.
• Remind yourself of the positives – independence, growth, travel, life experience!
• Explore new positive ways to cope with change through connecting with others.
• Make friends – say yes to social invitations.
• Seek information and support from services at your university/school
Lil eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 7:36 pm
Mallika eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 8:34 pm
SAAMI
Participant
5 Mar. 7:37 pm
I love that cat!
roberta
Participant
5 Mar. 7:38 pm
Hi there, I moved to Australia to study only a couple of months ago and I have been dating a guy I met during our orientation week. Things are moving fast and I wanted to know where I can go for advice on contraception?
Jo eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 8:34 pm
Hi there Roberta, thanks for your question. Depending on what state you live in there are a number of services you can access for sexual health info such as contraception. If you have overseas student health care cover you can speak to any GP for advice around contraception (most universities will have a health service with GP’s students can access for free. Often these health services on campus will offer the following services to students, contraception info, sexual health checks, including chlamydia testing and treatment, pregnancy counseling etc. With the OSHC card, you'll just need to pay the cost up-front and claim it back from your private health insurance.

I’ve included a link below with a list of specific sexual health services in every state that might be helpful for you to look at too.

Sexual Health Services in every state around Australia:
Jo eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 8:30 pm
Just also following on from your question Roberta, the videos below have been developed for international students by the University of Newcastle and provides information and advice about sexual health and the health care system in Australia. They look at things such as the importance of safe sex, discussing STIs, health service costs, and sex and the law.
Lil eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 7:42 pm
SAAMI
Participant
5 Mar. 7:42 pm
I’m really shy and I don’t know how or if I can make friends with people at my university........ what should I do?
Katherine eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 7:42 pm
Thanks for jumping online to chat Saami. It can be really tough to be at a new university and in a new place!
Making friends and meeting new people can be challenging for a number of reasons. It’s normal to feel a little stressed or worried about this. Settling into a new environment and being around a lot of new people can sometimes make us feel uncomfortable, anxious and impact our confidence. Attending university can be a great opportunity to meet new people and make friends.
It’s important to remember that friendships don’t just automatically happen, they do take some time and effort to develop.
Be open to the idea of making friends, smile and say hi to people, try to remember people’s name when speaking with them (a trick is to repeat their name back to them when they introduce themselves), look for friends social media accounts as another way to stay connected with them, say yes to social invitations, attend orientation programs and social activities organised by the university, volunteering, join an interest group or club and if there isn’t one that interests you – make your own!
If you’re feeling shy, maybe while your friendship is developing, you can do something that does not involve needing to talk the whole time. You could go for a walk or exercise with a friend, or see a movie, you could also organise a study session with someone.
Lil eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 7:44 pm
Jo eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 8:35 pm
Safety:
Just a couple of things about keeping yourself (and others) safe!
It is really important to look after yourself and to be aware of the risks that exist, and ways to minimise them.
Most tertiary institutes will have on-campus security, if you are on-campus and require assistance to ensure you feel, and are, safe. You should contact on-campus security. It is important that you are aware of the location of their office and the phone number for calling security.
Some large intuitions offer a security escort service, this can be helpful if you are leaving class late or if you are feeling unsafe. You should ask your university or school what they can provide.
You should also make sure you know where your local police station is. It’s likely that you won’t need to go there but it’s important to know where it is – just in case!
Wherever you are in Australia, if you require urgent assistance or if there’s a life-threatening emergency, call 000 (‘zero, zero, zero’). An operator will answer and ask which of the following services you need: Police, Fire or Ambulance. If you’re not sure which one you need, just tell the operator what you are calling about and they will help guide you. If you don’t speak English, tell the operator your language and you will be connected to a translator who will be able to assist.
Lil eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 7:48 pm
Katherine eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 7:49 pm
Know your rights!
It’s important that you are aware of your rights as an international student in Australia. It can feel a bit overwhelming and be confusing, but we hope to point you in the right direction of who you can talk to about your rights, if you feel you are not being treated fairly.
It’s important to be aware of your visa conditions, accommodation rights and work rights and responsibilities, for example. Check out Council of International Students Australia for an overview of your rights: http://www.cisa.edu.au/student-rights/
Here are some more useful website to have a look at regarding your rights.
Work:
Accommodation:
Domestic and relational violence:
Arranged marriage and forced marriage:
Access to health (and mental health) support:
  • via your OSHC insurance and further information via your educational institution
Jo
Participant
5 Mar. 7:49 pm
Thanks - this has been really helpful to read through!
Lil eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 7:49 pm
Jo eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 8:08 pm
What is stress and recognizing SIGNS of distress?

Some common indicators of when there may be more stress than you can cope with:

• Frequent unexplained absences from class
• Marked changes in concentration
• Extreme fatigue
• Increased procrastination and avoidance of tasks
• Withdrawing from friends
• Prolonged depression & anxiety evidenced by sadness, apathy, weight loss/gain, tearfulness, sleeping difficulty. Feeling more aggressive
• Talk of suicide directly or indirectly, e.g. "I won't be around to take that exam anyway" , "It's all too hard, I can't go on"
• Signs of nervousness, agitation or excessive worry and anxiety
• Statements indicating a sense of worthlessness or helplessness
• Marked change in personal hygiene or appearance
• Difficulties with speech, disjointed thoughts and losing touch with reality
• Increase in alcohol or drug misuse
• Withdrawing from friends and family
• Frequent negative statements about self and the future
Katherine eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 7:53 pm
Jo eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 7:54 pm
How can I improve or maintain my emotional wellbeing

• Talking to a friend, seeing a doctor or accessing online or phone counselling are great first steps towards feeling better.
• Balancing academic pressure with personal health. Making sure you keep up enough exercise, engaging in social groups, or volunteer groups, to reduce isolation because it’s very isolating coming to a new country and adjusting to a new language and new culture.
Katherine eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 8:06 pm
Jo eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 8:09 pm
Accessing Mental Health Support

A number of studies have shown that international students are at risk of psychological problems with higher levels of symptoms related to depression, anxiety and stress when compared with Australian students. It’s important though not to ignore these feelings though. We all feel sad from time to time, but some of us have these feelings more often, more strongly or for a longer period of time. If you are feeling depressed, you might find it hard to cope with normal tasks each day. If you feel any of these things, it’s important to ask for help as soon as possible, remember depression and anxiety can be treated.

Seeking a psychologist can be a helpful step towards managing anxiety and depression and it’s important to know that as an international student you may be able to claim some of the cost with Overseas Student Health Cover (OSHC).

Your health cover will pay some but not all of the psychologist’s fee. The fee you pay is called a gap fee (the gap between the amount covered by insurance, and the total fee).
There is more info on the below link:

https://www.studymelbourne.vic.gov.au/help-and-support/oshc-and-seeking-help-from-a-psychologist

Studies in Australia have some more information about what types of support services are available for international students, check it out here:
Katherine eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 7:54 pm
Katherine eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 8:10 pm
Useful Services and Resources:
First, it is often most useful to seek support, advice and information from the institution you are studying at. They are best equipped to provide support and information, or point you in the right direction of external local services.

If required you may consider contacting one of these services:
  • Overseas Students Ombudsmen
The Overseas Students Ombudsman investigates complaints about problems that international students have with their education institutions in Australia. This service is free, independent and impartial. You can find out more about how the Overseas Students Ombudsman can help you on their website: http://www.ombudsman.gov.au/How-we-can-help/overseas-students

You can make a complaint online, or over the phone in your own language with the use of an interpreter if you need.
  • Council of International Students Australia (CISA)
The National Peak Student Representative Body for International Students studying at undergraduate and postgraduate levels.
  • International Student Hotline
Phone: 1300 363 079 (Monday to Friday, 8am to 6pm)
The Australian Government provides this hotline to make sure you can receive the support you need while you are studying here in Australia. If you have any concerns or questions in regards to your study, safety, accommodation or work, you can call this number. You don’t have to give your name or personal details when you’re calling.
  • Grief Line
24/7 online counselling services (web chat)
Phone counselling services midday-3am AEST
Katherine eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 7:56 pm
Rob eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 7:58 pm
Thanks for chatting with us today guys!
Katherine eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 7:58 pm
Bye everyone! Thanks for all your questions tonight. It's been great to chat with you.
Take care of yourselves and each other!
Lil eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 7:59 pm
Thank you for your questions and input guys! Please don't forget to look after yourselves and reach out for support if you need it. Bye!
Mallika eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 7:59 pm
Thanks for joining in, and asking such great questions! :D
Jo eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 7:59 pm
Thanks to everyone for logging on for tonight's chat, hopefully it's been helpful and you're aware of what services are available for you to access as an international student! Good luck with your studies!!.
SAAMI
Participant
5 Mar. 7:59 pm
Thanks!!!
Lil eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 7:59 pm
Jo
Participant
5 Mar. 8:00 pm
Byyyyyeeeeeeeeeeeeee :)
roberta
Participant
5 Mar. 8:00 pm
Thanks for a great chat!
Lily
Participant
5 Mar. 8:00 pm
Bye!
Priya
Participant
5 Mar. 8:35 pm
This chat has been so helpful, thanks!
Katherine eheadspace
Moderator
5 Mar. 8:35 pm