eheadspace Group Chat
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Group Chat
Suicidal thoughts
June 19th 2016 @ 7pm AEST
At times we can struggle with intense thoughts that we don’t know how to cope with, or that make us lose hope that anything will change. Sometimes this can lead to contemplating suicide which can be like a road block to moving forward.

Feeling suicidal does not mean you are crazy, weak or flawed. It likely indicates that you feel you have more pain than you can cope with right now. For most people suicidal thoughts are confusing; as much as you want to die, you may also want a solution to your difficulties. You may want others to understand how you feel and hope that they can help.

Having such mixed feelings and being unsure about what to do can cause great anxiety. With time and support you can overcome your problems and the pain and suicidal feelings will pass.
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
23rd Aug, 4:41 pm
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
23rd Aug, 4:41 pm
Kristal eheadspace: Hi everyone, tonight we’re talking about a pretty serious topic. We’ve been wanting to talk a bit more about suicidal thoughts in one of our group chats as we think it will be good to have some information available about how to cope with those thoughts, how to support yourself or someone else with those thoughts and details for services who are available for more support or information.
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
23rd Aug, 4:42 pm
Kristal eheadspace: We’re hoping you’ll submit any questions you have about suicidal thoughts, but we do ask that you remember this is a public forum…this means that we won’t be posting any questions that contain personal or identifying information, or any content that we feel could be distressing for people to read. We will send a private message if for some reason we can’t post something you’ve submitted.
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
23rd Aug, 4:42 pm
Kristal eheadspace: We also really want to emphasise that we’re aware that talking about suicidal thoughts can be confronting, headspace is not a crisis service but if you’re needing some support tonight you can contact Kids Help Line: Phone 1800 55 1800 www.kidshelp.com.au or Lifeline: Phone 13 11 14 www.lifeline.org.au
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
23rd Aug, 4:42 pm
Kristal eheadspace: Tonight you’ll be chatting with eheadspace clinicians Clair, Jessie, Jo, Lauren and Sally – welcome to you all! We also have Trent, Rachel and Alessandro from our hY NRG team chatting with us remotely (so sometimes their replies will be a bit slow). They’ll be able to offer a younger perspective on things and one of my favourite things about these group chats is seeing you all supporting each other. So if you have advice please feel free to pop that through to us too!
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23rd Aug, 4:45 pm
Comment From Rachael
Hello All!! I'm Rachael from the headspace National Youth Reference Group. I'm here to share my experiences having suicidal thoughts and help answer your questions as best I can :)
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23rd Aug, 4:45 pm
Comment From Khloe
Why do people become suicidal?
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
23rd Aug, 4:45 pm
sally eheadspace: This is a pretty big question, and honestly it’s different for every person who has experienced suicidal thoughts. It’s very confronting for most people to hear that a loved one is having these thoughts, and it’s often hard to understand why they might be having them. This is because having suicidal thoughts isn’t something your brain is meant to do. Suicidal thoughts are a sign that your brain isn’t working quite as it should.
When we experience pain in our bodies we are usually pretty confident that it is as a result of some kind of injury or other physical health problem. When we find ourselves experiencing suicidal thoughts it is usually a sign that all is not well with our mental health – but it can be a lot more confusing and harder to accept than the physical health problem signals that we get! Because we ‘live’ in our heads through our thoughts etc and hear our own voice in our head, we think that we must be responsible for all the thoughts that we have, that we are in ‘control’ of having those thoughts. But healthy brains don’t think about suicide in an ongoing way – that is a pretty big ‘pain’ signal from your brain and definitely something worth checking out with a mental health professional. You are no more expected to know how to deal with those thoughts than you would be expected to fix a broken leg on your own!
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
23rd Aug, 4:46 pm
Jessie eheadspace: Hey everyone I'm Jessie :)
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
23rd Aug, 4:46 pm
eheadspace Jo: Hi...my name's Jo and I'm a clinician with eheadspace...welcome everybody :)
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23rd Aug, 4:46 pm
Comment From Alessandro hYNRG
Hi I'm Alessandro, I'm part of the national reference group.
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23rd Aug, 4:46 pm
Comment From Trent hY NRG
Hi all! Im Trent, also from the hY NRG mob, and look forward to our discussion tonight. I also have a lived experience of suicide, so hopefully I can be of assistance this evening!
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23rd Aug, 4:47 pm
Comment From Makayla
I was wondering if someone knows anybody good to talk to that is close
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
23rd Aug, 4:47 pm
Jo eheadspace: Hey Makayla...welcome to the chat. We're not sure where you're located so I'd recommend calling either Lifeline on 13 11 14 or Suicide Call Back Service on 1300 659 467 and they can direct to a professional in your local area. Does that help I'm wondering?
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23rd Aug, 4:47 pm
Comment From boyd
this is a step further to suicidal thoughts but in the same realm...Do self harming techniques significantly differ across males and females? For example male may cut deeper but won't cut many times along the arm where's a girl might cut many times along the arm but may be less damaging
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
23rd Aug, 4:47 pm
Lauren eheadspace: Thanks for your question Boyd. Self-harm techniques don't usually differ between males and females. What can usually impacts self-harm techniques is the persons state of mind at the time.
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23rd Aug, 4:47 pm
Comment From Dee187
What are some contingencies a person who is helping a suicidal friend or family member can put in place to ensure a loved ones safety? Also what are some good things to include in a care plan for self injury and suicidal patients?
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
23rd Aug, 4:47 pm
Thanks for your question Dee187…. I’m sure that this is something that many family and friends think about.
This is a really big topic, and I of course different for every individual, but there are some things that are key across most situations. I think that the most important thing is to try to keep communication open between you are the person you are concerned about. The more they are able to get the support they need.
I think it’d be really great for you to suggest that the person to try to get in contact with a professional service like eHeadspace… and if at first they are apprehensive, I’d keep encouraging them in a supportive way. Maybe you could suggest you can call together, to help him feel more comfortable.
If the person is reluctant to call someone when he’s experiencing suicidal thoughts, you might be able to help them come up with a Safety Plan. A safety plan can help people to keep themselves safe when they are experiencing intense feelings or suicidal thoughts.
Here are some things you can help your family/friend to write down:
1. What might be signs that I’m feeling suicidal? Ex: “When I’m feeling suicidal, I stop talking to my family”
2. What can I do to comfort myself? Create a list of things that are soothing / comforting and make you feel safe. Ex: listen to music, walk the dog, play playstation.
3. What are my reasons for living? Help remember why it’s worth staying alive. Ex: my best mate, my siblings, my parents, my pet.
4. Who can I talk to? Include family, friends, and professionals.
5. How can I make the environment safe? Remove things that you might hurt yourself with or go somewhere where you are unable to hurt yourself, like a café.
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23rd Aug, 4:48 pm
Comment From Alessandro hYNRG
There is also the Mental Health Line at 1800 011 511 that can direct you to relevant services.
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
23rd Aug, 4:48 pm
Kristal eheadspace: Thanks Alessandro - you're right, in NSW you can call that number for advice :)
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
23rd Aug, 4:48 pm
Jo eheadspace: Hey Guest...good question. I think what was meant by that is that having ongoing suicidal thoughts is a sign of a mental health issue, usually depression and that needs professional assessment and treatment
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23rd Aug, 4:48 pm
Comment From Rachael hY NRG
Hey Amy,
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23rd Aug, 4:48 pm
Comment From Guest
what part of the brain doesnt work as it should?
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23rd Aug, 4:49 pm
Comment From piper
my aunt really puts me down. would just avoiding her help or do i tell my family what i feel about her. its hard though because shes family
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
23rd Aug, 4:49 pm
Jo eheadspace: Hey Piper...welcome to the chat and I'm sorry to hear that your aunt is being respectful with you and it would be understandable to want to avoid her. It can be helpful to find a time to talk to one of your parents about how you're feeling...using assertive speak like when my aunt says this then I feel like this and want to do this. Does that make sense?
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
23rd Aug, 4:49 pm
Jo eheadspace: Piper - *isn't being respectful
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23rd Aug, 4:50 pm
Comment From Sam
Hi Guys, I only get a few suicidal thoughts around exam time, and I haven't told anyone about it. If it doesn't last very long do I still have to talk to someone about it?
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
23rd Aug, 4:50 pm
Lauren eheadspace: Thanks for your questions Sam. Exam time can be super stressful and anxiety provoking which can lead to our thoughts becoming more negative.
It's great that you've been able to identify that these thoughts are occurring at the same time, it might be beneficial to go and chat to someone, so that you can get some stress and anxiety relieving tips and tools, so you don't have to feel this way!
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23rd Aug, 4:50 pm
Comment From Amy
I’ve been suicidal for a long time and recently people at school found out. Since then they’ve been treating me differently and I’m not allowed to go to the bathroom by myself anymore. I’ve never done anything at school so I don’t understand why they’re acting so scared.
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
23rd Aug, 4:50 pm
Kristal eheadspace: Thanks for your input, Amy. I’m sorry that you have been feeling so awful and that you’ve had suicidal thoughts for such a long time 
I imagine that it’s been really hard to have your privacy and independence at school effected. Especially when it seems like the reaction is a bit “over-the-top” or unnecessary. People’s behaviours are often in response to how they feel. So people being on high alert and acting like they are scared for your wellbeing might be their way of showing that they care for you and want to make sure you are ok.
I wonder whether talking to a few close people who you trust (like a trusted teacher… a close friend) to let them know when you are doing ok and when you aren’t doing ok might help people to understand your experiences better and help them to know when you are safe and when you need support.
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23rd Aug, 4:50 pm
Comment From Rachael hY NRG
Hey Amy, I think the people around you might be as confused about the situation as you are, and they're just trying to be as supportive as possible. Trying to pretend that not feeling these things might only worry them more - in my experience it's best to have a frank conversation with the people involved and tell them how they support you n a way thats more helpful, even if all you need is to be treated totally normal. Talkng about it sucks but it's going to put everyone more at ease once it's clear.
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23rd Aug, 4:50 pm
Comment From piper
yeah
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23rd Aug, 4:51 pm
Comment From John
I’ve decided to tell my mum about the thoughts that I’ve been having but I don’t know the best way to tell her.
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
23rd Aug, 4:51 pm
Jo eheadspace: Good on you for making the decision to let your mum know about the thoughts you’ve been having, John!
Talking to someone you trust can be really helpful and can help you feel less alone with these really strong feelings and thoughts.
Starting the conversation can feel tough – It’s natural to feel nervous or anxious. Planning out how you might start the conversation can help you to feel more comfortable and ready.
Here are a couple of ideas of ways you might want to start the conversation, but you can definitely use words that feel more your own…
“Things have been feeling full on for me lately and I'm wondering if we can talk about it.”
“I've been feeling really upset and some of the things I've been thinking are starting to worry me.”
If it still feels too hard to start that conversation in person, have a think about other ways of letting mum know… like writing her a letter that you can read through together. Or even just write a note to mum saying that you need to talk, so that she can start the conversation.
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23rd Aug, 4:51 pm
Comment From Jane
Hey I’ve got this friend at school, right, who was feeling really suicidal and depressed. She used to say how crap she felt all term until last school holidays, when all of a sudden she said she was feeling better. She was laughing and looking happier so, yeah, me and all her friends thought she was better. Then on the holidays tried to kill herself and got taken to hospital. I felt crap and guilty for not ‘doing more’ for her – though I don’t know what more I could’ve done. How can this happen- someone saying they want to kill themselves before suddenly saying they feel better, then going on to make another suicide attempt?
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
23rd Aug, 4:51 pm
Jessie eheadspace: Hi Jane,
I'm really sorry to hear about your experience with your friend - it would have felt so scary and upsetting to hear that she wanted to end her life.
Sometimes when people are suddenly a lot happier it can be a warning sign that they are not ok. For some people they experience relief when they're planned to suicide and this is what can cause the sudden change in their mood. It's so hard to pick up on this though and it really makes sense why you would have thought things were feeling better for her.
It's really normal to feel guilt and confusion when somebody we love engages in suicidal behaviour. We place these impossible expectations on ourselves to know where the person is at and we can feel responsible for them too. It sounds like you were really supportive of her and I have no doubt that you did everything you could to help.
When a friend is going through a tough time or talking about suicide, it's important to have our own support and to let an adult know if we are worried about them. Reachout have an awesome fact sheet on supporting a person who is experiencing suicidal thoughts: https://au.reachout.com/articles/my-friend-is-suicidal
It's important to look after yourself too Jane and know that you can talk with a counsellor to get support too. We all need a safe space to talk things through.
Hope your friend has the support she needs and is getting back on track :)
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23rd Aug, 4:52 pm
Comment From Mel
ive tried lots of times to talk to my mum about the dark thoughts I have but i always chicken out because im afraid of how she will react.do you have any idea for what might help me?
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
23rd Aug, 4:52 pm
Kristal eheadspace: Hey Mel, great minds huh! I think if you read Jo's answer to John you might find some good advice there :)
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23rd Aug, 4:52 pm
Comment From Joel
Is suicide an ilness?
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
23rd Oct, 11:17 am
sally eheadspace: Hi Joel, Sally here, thanks for your question..suicide is a complex area and may sometimes be related to an illness or psychological distress but can not be cleanly put into any category. People will have a very unique experience of suicidal thoughts and behaviours and support for that person will best be provided on an individual basis. This link has more information on the subject which you might find helpful
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23rd Aug, 4:53 pm
Comment From Aimee
My counsellor has helped me make a safety plan and I do use it whenever I start to notice those thoughts but I don’t think the safety plan is taking them away. I don’t know what actually will stop those thoughts completely but I don’t think the safety plan is enough.
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
23rd Aug, 4:55 pm
Lauren eheadspace: Thanks for writing in Aimee, this is a really good question! I am sorry to hear that the thoughts are bothering you, but it sounds like you and your counsellor have done some really good work together to create a plan to help keep you safe when the thoughts come up. But I can hear that you would really like the thoughts to just go away!
Which is an understandable because I would imagine that the thoughts are quite painful and hard to tolerate. But often we find it very hard to control our thoughts and sometimes when we do try our thoughts can even become stronger or pop up in ways we don’t expect.
But there are things you can do to help! There is a very popular approach in therapy called Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and involves using something called mindfulness (maybe you have heard of it?) to help us to feel more at peace with uncomfortable thoughts and feelings. So it is not that they go away, but when they pop up you might feel less distressed by them.
One way of doing this is by thinking of thoughts as just thoughts, you do not need to act on them, change them or get rid of them instead when you notice them pop into your head you can say to yourself ‘I am having the thought that I want to hurt myself’ and this might help you to feel a little more distant from these thoughts.
Here is a youtube clip that leads you through this exercise:
And, if you want to learn more about Mindfulness, or it can also be thought of a meditation, you can check out this website: http://smilingmind.com.au/. And this one is really good for specifically managing thoughts of wanting to die: https://au.reachout.com/articles/what-to-do-if-you-are-having-thoughts-about-wanting-to-die
I hope those suggestions are helpful, and good luck in starting to practice some mindfulness, it can help with all sorts of distressing feelings. And, think about bring these resources into your next counselling session and talking to your counsellor more about it—she/he might also have some good ideas to help you manage those thoughts is a way that feels less distressing. Take care.
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24th Aug, 9:12 am
Comment From Jared
I told my dad about this a few days ago and he’s not sure where I should be talking to. I think it would help if I could tell him where we should go. Now I feel like ive worried him and hes feeling like he doesn’t know what to do. Who should I talk to about this?
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
24th Aug, 9:13 am
Thanks for asking that question Jared, it sounds like a tricky one!
It is great that you were able to reach out to your Dad for support with the suicidal thoughts/deliberate self-harm and now you are trying to work out the next step together.
I would suggest linking in with your local headspace centre. You can find a centre here: https://headspace.org.au/headspace-centres/ Just pop in your post code and it will tell you your nearest centre.
Another option would be to go to your local GP and have a chat with a doctor about a referral to a local psychologist. If you go for this option, just ask for an extended appointment when you book with the clinic.
Also, feeling worried that you have worried him can be a common response for young people when it comes to talking to parents about what is going on. But I would imagine that he is really pleased that you did reach out to him, even if this stuff can be a bit scary at first.
When you link up with either the headspace centre or local doctor you can also speak to them about having these worried about your Dad- they might be able to talk to you about ways to manage that worry and how to talk to your Dad.
You also might want to give your Dad this weblink: http://parentsguide.beyondblue.org.au/#folio=1 It is a handbook called ‘A Parents’ Guide to Anxiety and Depression in Young People’ and could have some ideas for your Dad.
Finally, if you want to check in with an eheadspace clinician while you wait to be linked in with a face to face, our service is available every day from 9am until 1am AEST and you can contact us by webchat, phone on 1800 650 890, or email.
Take care and good luck!
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24th Aug, 9:14 am
Comment From Linda
My beautiful daughter took her life 27/1/16 she was only 22 and we were totally shocked by it. I wish we had known how awful she felt, we would have helped and supported her as much as we could. We loved her so much and the heartache of not being there in her last moments is so hard. I hope that everyone reading this feels able to tell someone how they’re feeling. And trust me, your parents want to know. It’s better to know and work together to find support, perhaps she was afraid we would worry, or wouldn’t know how to get her through – but that would be better than where we are now.
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
24th Aug, 9:14 am
Kristal eheadspace: Hi Linda, we’re so sorry to hear of your loss. Accepting the death of a loved one is no easy task and adjusting to a “new normal” is confronting and confusing. One of the hardest aspects of bereavement following suicide is not fully understanding why the person has taken their own life.
We hope you’re receiving support from your friends and family, and we wanted to let you know that you access further professional support too. You can see your GP and ask them for recommendations (it’s best to book a double appointment to give you time to explore your options). You can also google “grief support” and your state – this will likely give you information about phone support available to you.
Again, we’re sorry for your loss and we thank you for sharing your experience and your encouragement for others to reach out for support.
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24th Aug, 9:14 am
Comment From piper
i usually have suicidal thoughts that really effect me, but i cant get rid of them no matter what i do..any suggestions to get rid of them?
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
24th Aug, 9:14 am
Jo eheadspace: Hey Piper...suicidal thoughts can be quite scary and upsetting and most people during their lifetime will at some stage have them during stressful times. It's when they don't go away and become intrusive and don't allow you to live your daily life that it might be time to reach out and see a counsellor.
Here is a great link about 'Helping yourself when you are suicidal' with some good tips on distractions. Also if the thoughts become overwhelming then call Lifeline on 13 11 14 or Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467. Hope that helps Piper
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24th Aug, 9:15 am
Comment From piper
i dont really feel like my councelor helps. i just feel the same after, should i get a new councelor?
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
24th Aug, 9:15 am
Jo eheadspace: Piper...can I ask whether you discuss the suicidal thoughts in your counselling session?
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24th Aug, 9:15 am
Comment From abby
hi!!sometimes when suicide comes to mind i feel guilty about it and i ffeel really weak for thinkinv that. is that normal?
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
24th Aug, 9:15 am
Jessie eheadspace: Hey there Abby,
Sorry to hear things have felt so tough for you - great to have you on board to chat tonight.
Guilt is a common response to having thoughts of suicide. Sometimes that's related to our judgement or ourselves and our difficulty with understanding and expressing our emotions. Us humans are great at judging ourselves for how we're feeling and those judgements are the very things that can keep us stuck.
I think it's important to find a way to communicate how you're feeling to somebody you trust - a friend, parents, teacher or a counsellor? Learning to talk about our feelings can help us to be more compassionate towards ourselves and a whole lot more able to cope.
So do think about reaching out for support and know that things can get better with support :)
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24th Aug, 9:16 am
Comment From Josie
I never know when I should go into see someone at the hospital. I’ve had to go a few times, but I’m never sure whether to go or not. I have suicidal thoughts most of the time, but they’re usually under control. I don’t like going into hospital because they make me feel like I’m there for attention. What should I look for so I know when to go into hospital?
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
24th Aug, 9:16 am
Jo eheadspace: It can be really tricky to know sometimes when is the right time to go to hospital when we’re feeling suicidal.
We hear this a lot from people, so you’re definitely not alone there! It’s also really important to know that many people will experience suicidal thoughts from time to time, but may not necessarily “act” on them. Often, in situations like this, it can mean that we’re in a lot of “pain” during these moments and want this pain to stop, rather than wanting our life to end.
With that said, some good questions to ask yourself next time you’re experiencing thoughts of suicide might be;
“Am I thinking about ‘how’ I’m going to end my life right now?”, and
“Do I feel like I might act on these thoughts?”.
If you’re feeling like the answer to these questions might be a “yes”, and you’re also feeling like you can’t keep yourself safe, then this is when you need to take yourself to your local Emergency Department.
If, however, you’re feeling like it’s just the “thoughts” of suicide that you’re noticing, but feel like you can keep yourself safe/not act on them, then you may not need to go to the hospital during times like this. In these situations, it can be really great to think about the following questions;
- “What things can I do to distract myself from these thoughts”? (music, reading, watching tv, relaxation, going for a walk, etc) and also…
- “Who can I talk to if I need”? (family, friends, trusted adults, Psychologist).
Often if we can keep ourselves busy by doing something/anything when we notice that we’re feeling distressed, this can help to reduce our stress levels a bit and then re-focus our attention on something different/more enjoyable in the moment :)
Have a read through these links for more information on this topic…
Hope this is helpful Josie
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24th Aug, 9:17 am
Comment From jak
i want help for my suicidal thoughts and i dont want help at the same time :/
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
24th Aug, 9:17 am
sally eheadspace: hi Jak thanks for your input. A lot of people can find it hard to take that first step towards asking for support...it can make us feel pretty uncomfortable and we might worry about what others will think of us once they know how we're feeling
there are different types of support… support that you access on your own are called self-supports. Self supports are healthy active coping strategies which you use to get you through hard times. It can be as simple as learning to breathe deeply as a way to still your mind. There is a guided breathing exercise app here:https://au.reachout.com/tools-and-apps/reachout-breathe Playing sport, eating well, getting enough sleep, learning what you relaxes you and what distracts you from some of those thoughts are all great ways to build up your self supports. It’s also good to build your awareness of what triggers those thoughts, what stresses you out – if there are negative situations, they might be bringing you down but they might also be avoidable.
Other support involves talking about your thoughts and feelings so that you have an experience of sharing the load… you get to understand, accept, even change some of your thoughts and feelings through exploring them with a compassionate listener (a trusted friend or a professional counsellor for example). People may have reactions that you find hard to tolerate, like worrying about you. Some people though (trained counsellors in particular) don’t make judgements about whatever thoughts go through the human mind. They generally have the perspective that thoughts are different to actions and behaviour and that thoughts are something to be worked with and explored compassionately, not something to be judged, avoided, freaked out by or laughed at. Generally speaking it’s a good idea to have a mixture of self supports and face to face support. We’re usually pretty good at supporting ourselves when things are feeling good, but you don’t have to do it all by yourself when times are tough. Part of the counselling process is to explore self supports that work for you so that you’ve got great resources to draw on when you’re by yourself.
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Comment From tayla
i nearly told the school chaplan i was feeling suicidal but then i got scared they would tell mum. is that going to happen??
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24th Aug, 9:18 am
Comment From tayla
i nearly told the school chaplan i was feeling suicidal but then i got scared they would tell mum. is that going to happen??
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
24th Aug, 9:18 am
Hi Tayla and thanks for that great question.... and it's its great that you are seeking support.
I would really encourage you to speak to your chaplain about how you feeling. They will be able to help you work through some of these feelings.... or maybe refer you to another service for more appropriate if you are in need of extra support.
If the chaplain is really concerned about your immediate safety, they have a responsibility to make sure you are safe and would have to break confidentiality..... but they should always to talk you about this before doing so. We take breaking confidentiality very seriously.
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24th Aug, 9:18 am
Comment From George
The other day I was at home and feeling pretty shit coz just broke up with my boyfriend. My friends were just telling me he wasn’t good enough for me and it’s a good thing but I feel like he was the only thing keeping me going. When I was at home I couldn’t sleep as usual and just started having all these thoughts about how much easier it would be if I wasn’t here. My life just feels pointless without him and I can’t see it getting any better. I know I’d never do anything because I’m too scared but yeah. I’m just sick of feeling this way.
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
23rd Oct, 11:58 am
Jessie eheadspace: I’m so sorry to hear about your break up George. Break ups are one of the hardest things we can go through (particularly if it’s your first relationship). When we lose somebody we love we can feel like our lives have lost meaning. This is a really awful space to be in.
Those thoughts of not being here are likely a part of your mind trying to problem solve how you’re feeling. I’m glad to hear you’d never act on them and I think what you’re saying there highlights an interesting fact about thoughts - we can choose how we respond to them.
When you’re having those thoughts at night it might be useful to try and write them out or try some other distraction strategies to take your mind off them. Talk things out with family and friends during the day and have a think about chatting with a counsellor if things continue to feel intense over the next few weeks. You might also like to check out a past group chat we did on coping with break ups:
You’ve probs heard this from other people before but I really want you to hear that things won’t always feel this tough. It’s still in the early days of the break up and these thoughts and feelings will pass. It’s going to be so important to look after yourself and surround yourself with support people over the next few weeks.
And of course if you're worried about acting on those thoughts and feel like you need immediate support you can call Kids Helpline or Lifeline.
Take care George :)
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24th Aug, 9:19 am
Comment From Alys
My sister died by suicide last year and I don’t think my mum has coped very well with it. I haven’t either, but I’ve had good support. I’m really worried about my mum. What things help to cope with grief? What kinds of things can I get her to do that might help? She won’t see a counsellor.
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
24th Aug, 9:19 am
Kristal eheadspace: Oh Alys, we’re so sorry to hear of your loss. It’s such a difficult thing to cope with. I’m glad you’ve had some good support yourself – it does make a difference. Everyone’s reaction to grief is different, but these are some things that you could encourage mum to do.
• Spend time with loved ones and ask for help when you need it
• Take time for yourself when you need it, and tell others that you’re doing this
• Talk about your pain, this helps you feel less alone. A counsellor can be really helpful, but if she’s adamant she won’t see someone perhaps there are friends or family she can talk about this with?
• Eat regularly and get enough sleep – this can be really difficult, in fact it’s not uncommon to have to force yourself into a routine. But routine can help you cope with big emotions.
• Join a support group for people who have lost loved ones to suicide – google can be helpful here and a good starting point is “grief support” and your state.
Hopefully some of those things are helpful, it sounds like you’re very supportive and it’s really important to be looking after yourself too. Similar things could be helpful for you too, and remember if you need more support yourself you can contact eheadspace :)
Participant
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24th Aug, 9:19 am
Comment From Rachael hY NRG
Hey Piper, I have a tried and true method of dealing with negative thoughts and suicidal thoughts, which works for me, and that's moving. When I'm stuck with these thoughts I'll take myself outside and do a whole bunch of cartwheeels or I'll put on some music and dance (even if my hearts not in it) it just helps to get the blood moving again. And then if have some energy I'll focus on a new task - do the dishes, or paint or whatever .. but for me that first step is getting up and making myself move. It might not work for everyone but i'm sure with some expermentation you'll find what works for you.
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24th Aug, 9:20 am
Comment From Mary
i very rarely think of suicide. I used to though. I have been self harming for three years now, i was clean for a whole year but I've started again within the last few months. Although this isn't really 'suicide' based, i still want help if possible on how to stop causing harm to my body when i feel like it helps me so much
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
23rd Oct, 11:59 am
Lauren eheadspace: HI Mary, it's great that you have reached for some help with your self-harming. I'll post a link to a previous live info chat that we've had, that will hopefully give you some tips and strategies to help stop your self-harming.
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24th Aug, 9:20 am
Comment From abby
whenever i talk to someone about suicide and what ive been going through they just say 'its bad' or 'youre better than that' and ddrop the conversation. do suicidal thoughts make me a bad person, and how ccan i properly vent and talk to someone about this.
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24th Aug, 9:20 am
Comment From Alessandro hYNRG
Hey Jak, the reality of talking about these things is far less scary than what the brain can imagine. When you reach out for help to work on these thoughts, you realise that there are so many people out there who know exactly how you feel and can give you many great tools to develop resilience. It's hard to ask for help but it's much better than dealing with it alone.
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
24th Aug, 9:20 am
Jo eheadspace: Hey Abby...thanks for your question. No, suicidal thoughts do not make you a 'bad person'. What they say is that you're struggling and need help.
It can be hard when you're being open and vulnerable talking to people about feeling suicidal and them not knowing how to respond. It can feel like a rejection and might make it harder next time to open up.
Can I just say Abby, keep telling people how you feel and if there are some people who are more open than others, let them be your main supports. The other thing too is to have friends that you can turn to for support and social stuff and at the same time seek out an understanding counsellor to work on the suicidal thoughts and what might be bringing them up.
I hope this is helpful Abby and thanks again for coming past tonight
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24th Aug, 9:21 am
Comment From Judith
My son has a case manager who has encouraged us to talk openly with him if he’s indicating he’s feeling suicidal. She’s hoping we can keep him out of hospital again, but I feel so insecure about talk about suicide. How can I ask him about how he’s feeling and feel ok with hearing the answers?
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
24th Aug, 9:21 am
Kristal eheadspace: Hi Judith, great question!
Firstly, it’s actually really common to feel a little panicked and overwhelmed at the thought of having to ask directly about suicide. We hear this a lot, so you’re definitely not alone there! With that said, it’s really important to know that there are some good things you can do to help your son if he seems to be in a really tough place. A great place to start is letting your son know that you are concerned about him by asking directly; “Are you having thoughts of suicide”? Despite what some people think, this will definitely not put the idea in his head or cause him to do it, but rather let him know that you care and that you’re here to help in any way you can :)
Secondly, if your son has said that he “is” experiencing these thoughts, then the next step would be to ask him the following questions; “Have you thought about ‘how’ you might do this?”, and “do you feel you might act on these thoughts?”
If your son responds with answering “yes” to these questions, then it’s really important to let his case manager/treating team know about this, so that they can support your son through this challenging time. If you can’t get in touch with the case manager, and your son is saying he’s feeling unsafe, then it’s important you take your son down to your local Emergency Department where he can be get a mental health assessment/urgent support.
Remember, that it’s very common to feel a bit uncomfortable talking about suicide, however it can be such a huge relief for young people to be asked this question. These difficult, but necessary questions will give your son permission to speak openly about his feelings and get the support he needs :)
Have a read through these links for some more information on this topic….
Participant
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24th Aug, 9:22 am
Comment From Guest
My girlfriend has been experiencing suicidal thoughts for the past year, since her parents got divorced. She lives with her mum and they fight all the time. Her mum doesn’t know about her suicidal thoughts. I feel like I am the only person who is able to support her and it feels really full on sometimes. Thanks, Kate.
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
24th Aug, 9:22 am
sally eheadspace: Thanks for your input, Kate. Supporting a partner who is suicidal can be enormously taxing, especially when feeling alone in that support role. Carrying that role alone can be too much for anyone, so try to share the responsibility by talking with someone. You might find it helpful to talk with a counsellor or friend of your own, to have a space of your own to share how your girlfriend’s experienced is affecting you.
Here are a few specific tips of how you can take care of yourself, so you can be the best support you can be to your girlfriend:
- Allow people to care for you too and ask for help or support when you need it.
- Ensure you also have time to yourself when you need it: you can’t be there for your girlfriend 24/7, you’re not super-human!
- Do all the healthy-behaviour things: eat well, get enough sleep, exercise regularly and have down-time.
- Make sure you are still doing the things you enjoy and that are important to you.
Take care Sally
Participant
Participant
24th Aug, 9:22 am
Comment From Mary
is it possible for one my friends to become depressed because of me constantly telling her about my depression, Eating disorder and self harm?
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
24th Aug, 9:22 am
Lauren eheadspace: Hi Mary, this is a great question! It sounds like there is a lot happening for you and that maybe the best person to speak to is a counsellor, which means that you're friend can be there just to support you and be a great friend, rather than relying on them to make you feel better.
Mental health can be contagious, that is that if we spend lots of time around someone who is really negative, we can start to feel really negative ourselves.
This is not to say that you shouldn't speak to your friend about how you're feeling, it's more about having a number of supports and people that you can turn to.
Here is a link that you can give to your friend that gives some tips and advice around helping a friend with depression:
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
24th Aug, 9:23 am
Lauren eheadspace: Here is a little image of 50 ways to take a break! It's really important that we all take a break sometimes to help us decrease our stress, anxiety and to generally feel a bit better!
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
24th Aug, 9:23 am
Participant
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24th Aug, 9:23 am
Comment From Mackenzie
Whenever I'm suicidal I usually try act on it and I tell my mental health team but they don't do anything to help or if I look for help in turned away
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
24th Aug, 9:24 am
Jo eheadspace: Hey Mackenzie...thanks for your question and it sounds like it would be quite invalidating not being taken seriously when you're telling people that you're feeling suicidal.
I think it's important to have a safety plan that you can work on with your mental health team so that you are both on the same page when you're feeling suicidal.
Things like who to call both ie family/friends and/or crisis service; what to do with the thoughts of suicide and how to not engage with them; distraction techniques like having a warm shower or a bath, listening to calming music, watching youtube videos, drinking calming tea or a hot chocolate and writing down your thoughts in a journal.
Here's a great link on safety planning with some of the stuff I mentioned - https://au.reachout.com/articles/how-to-make-a-safety-plan
Also, if you have a family member or friend that can talk to your MH team about how you're feeling that can be helpful too. Hope this has been helpful Mackenzie and thanks again for being part of this conversation
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24th Aug, 9:24 am
Comment From Jennifer
Thank you for this chat, it’s such a necessary topic and so confronting to talk about in person. I’m hoping you can give me some information about things to observe for in young people which might indicate they are suicidal. I’m a high school teacher and I feel like I just don’t have enough information to be aware of if my students are struggling. It would also be good to know what to do if I notice anything that indicates someone is suicidal. Thanks!
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
23rd Oct, 11:18 am
Hi Jennifer, thank you for writing into us.
This is a good question and it sounds like you really care for the emotional wellbeing of your students, teachers can play such an important role in helping young people to find support when they are struggling.
So yes, there are some ‘warning signs’ that a young people might show when they are feeling suicidal. These are included in this weblink along with some suggestions about how to respond to warning signs:
To find more information about suicide the Suicide Call Back Service (https://www.suicidecallbackservice.org.au/resources/worried-about-someone/) has lots of really good information.
I hope that helps and please feel free to get in touch with us again if you have any more questions, alternatively the Suicide Call Back Service also has a phone line you can call: 1300 659 467
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
24th Aug, 9:26 am
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
24th Aug, 9:26 am
Participant
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24th Aug, 9:26 am
Comment From Rachael hY NRG
Hey George, I just wanted to tell you that I've definitely been where you are, feeling like I'm not worth his time, and I don't deserve to be here... t's going to suck for a while, but i believe you'll get through it!
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
24th Aug, 9:26 am
Kristal eheadspace: Sometimes we can get trapped in negative thinking - I really liked Rachel's suggestion of how she deals with difficult thoughts. This image gives some more tips on how to interrupt negative thinking.
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
24th Aug, 9:27 am
Participant
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24th Aug, 9:27 am
Comment From Tom
sometimes i feel very suicidal but im too scared to talk to anyone over the phone like lifeline
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
24th Aug, 9:27 am
sally eheadspace: Hi Tom, it's a good point. Sometimes it's just too hard to verbalise what's going on inside our heads. But don't let that hold you back form reaching out for support! Lifeline have webchat so you don't have to talk if you don't want to :) Webchat can be a great stepping stone to talking on the phone or talking to a counsellor face to face
I hope that helps you reach out for support Tom
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24th Aug, 9:28 am
Comment From Mary
i how i should see a councillor, and i would rather see one at my school... however they say they have the right to tell my parents about what i say if they feel like they should. And i don't want that to happen, so i don't know whether i should go and talk to my school counsellor and just not tell them certain things? I don't know what i should do because i don't want my parents to know what is going on
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
24th Aug, 9:28 am
Lauren eheadspace: Hi Mary, Have a look at the answer to Tayla's question (at the 7:33 time mark)
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24th Aug, 9:28 am
Comment From abby
wwhat are some mental illnesses that mainly contribute ti major suicidal thouhhts?? bbesides anxiety and depression
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
24th Aug, 9:28 am
Jo eheadspace: Hey Abby...you're asking some really good questions! You're right that anxiety and depression are the main mental health issues that contribute towards someone having suicidal thoughts. If you're concerned about a more serious mental illness, then it would be good to visit your GP and discuss this further
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24th Aug, 9:30 am
Comment From Rachael hY NRG
Hey Mackenzie, (awesome name btw) I totally agree with Jo! It was really helpful for me to work out a plan and discuss this is my parents and my really close friends - I have a code word for when s*** is really messed up in my head, and need a safe place to stay for the night. The codeword is great cause I don't have to talk about it, or try to articulate whats happening, but my family knows that I need support and hugs, and that I'll try to explain it once I've calmed down a bit. Having a safety plan, and discussing with your more supportive friends really, really helps!
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24th Aug, 9:31 am
Comment From Tim
My brother committed suicide a number of years ago and his children are now moving into their teenage years. I’m wanting to be able to talk to them about how he died, they’ve lived with us since then and I feel it’s important to keep the communication lines open as they get older. They’ve had counselling and they’re really good kids, but their mum’s not around either so I want to make sure they stay ok.
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
23rd Oct, 11:18 am
Jessie eheadspace: Hey Tim,
I’m so sorry to hear about the loss of your brother and I can hear how supportive you are of your nieces and nephews.
Chatting with them about their father’s death will no doubt be a very difficult and emotional conversation. I’m not sure if they’re aware of how we died and our suggestions might vary depending on whether they know or not. However here are some general things to consider.
1. Pick a time to discuss it when everyone’s together at home and there are no other time pressures.
2. Go into the conversation with an idea of what you’d like them to know and this will help you to feel prepared for the discussion.
3. Allow room for any of the emotions that might come up and provide the kids with an opportunity to ask questions.
4. Things might feel a little raw afterwards and it’s good to mindful that the kids might need a little extra support. Maybe you could suggest that you do something relaxing together as a family afterwards. The kids might not be open to this and if they’re prefer a bit of space to process things then that’s ok too.
5. It could be the case that they might not know what to say or might have a hard time talking about things. This is really normal and I think inviting them to talk with you when they feel ready is useful in this situation.
6. This is a helpful link for people wanting to support young people who have experienced bereavement by suicide of a loved one - Jessie eheadspace: Hey Tim,
I’m so sorry to hear about the loss of your brother and I can hear how supportive you are of your nieces and nephews.
Chatting with them about their father’s death will no doubt be a very difficult and emotional conversation. I’m not sure if they’re aware of how we died and our suggestions might vary depending on whether they know or not. However here are some general things to consider.
1. Pick a time to discuss it when everyone’s together at home and there are no other time pressures.
2. Go into the conversation with an idea of what you’d like them to know and this will help you to feel prepared for the discussion.
3. Allow room for any of the emotions that might come up and provide the kids with an opportunity to ask questions.
4. Things might feel a little raw afterwards and it’s good to mindful that the kids might need a little extra support. Maybe you could suggest that you do something relaxing together as a family afterwards. The kids might not be open to this and if they’re prefer a bit of space to process things then that’s ok too.
5. It could be the case that they might not know what to say or might have a hard time talking about things. This is really normal and I think inviting them to talk with you when they feel ready is useful in this situation.
6. This is a helpful link for people wanting to support young people who have experienced bereavement by suicide of a loved one -
I hope that helps for now. You’re very welcome to get in touch with us to talk about this a bit more in depth. We do offer support to older adults concerned about young people. You can call on 1800 650 890 or contact through our website.
Thanks for your question Tim. Take care 
I hope that helps for now. You’re very welcome to get in touch with us to talk about this a bit more in depth. We do offer support to older adults concerned about young people. You can call on 1800 650 890 or contact through our website.
Thanks for your question Tim. Take care
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24th Aug, 9:31 am
Comment From Cathie
My 22 year old son recently attempted suicide after breaking up with his long-term girlfriend. He’s seeing a psychologist and seems to be doing better but he doesn’t talk to me very openly about how he’s coping. Is there anything I should be doing to support him and make sure that he doesn’t become suicidal again?
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
24th Aug, 9:31 am
Hi Cathie, it’s so good to hear that your son is accessing support for himself in the form of counselling and that he seems to be doing better!
It is always difficult as a parent to see your child suffer and it is very normal to want to know what is happening for them and be the one that they confide in. One of the developmental tasks of late adolescence is to differentiate from family and turn to external relationships ie friends, colleagues, teachers or other adult mentors for support rather than parents.
While this can leave parents feeling a bit in the dark, it’s a really healthy part of growing up for the whole family. It means that your young person is developing skills in building relationships and asking for help and that he will be able to get his needs met regardless of whether you are available.
The best thing you can do as his parent is remain open for chats if and when he is ready. Don’t be afraid to ask your young person is they’d like to share with you how they are going, but let them know that they can share things with you at their own pace and in their own time and trust your sense that he is feeling better than he was. Just knowing that you are there is huge support for him in itself.
It might help to make time for just the two do something together which you enjoy if you haven’t had that chance lately – that might create some space for a conversation about how he is going.
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24th Aug, 9:31 am
Comment From piper
i also find it really hard to talk to my counselor beacuse im someone who really likes to keep to themselves..should i just let it all out so i feel better at the end?
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
24th Aug, 9:31 am
Jo eheadspace: Hi Piper...yeah it can be hard to open up in counselling, especially if it's been hard in the past to talk to people about personal issues.
Something that I recommend to young people when we chat is to treat counselling similar to any other personal relationship and by that I mean it can take time to build trust and feel comfortable with each other. With each session you'll know yourself what feels right saying and it can also be helpful to talk to your counsellor about how hard it is in sessions to open up. Just talking about that stuff can be freeing :)
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24th Aug, 9:32 am
Comment From Guest
My best friend committed suicide last year. It’s been the hardest year ever since then. I just feel like I failed her. She was in and out of hospital and everyone knew that she was struggling with depression. We just never thought she would actually do it. I don’t know what more we could have done, but I’d really like to know what we should do if we become aware of someone feeling suicidal.
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
24th Aug, 9:32 am
sally eheadspace: I’m so sorry for your loss, how tragic. Losing a best friend can be so incredibly hard but especially so when you lose that person to suicide.
The question of, “is there more we could have done?” often reflects the harsh reality of suicide – that we may never truly understand why the person took their life. Sometimes there may be indicators that a person is struggling, other times these signs may not be so clear. It’s important to remember that it’s easier to recognise these signs of distress in hindsight and that subtle cues may be hard to pick up prior to their death.
If you become aware of someone feeling suicidal there are definitely things you can do. If you think they need immediate help, contact services like eHeadspace, Kidshelpline, Lifeline or 000 if you think they are in immediate danger.
If you think you might recognise signs that they are in distress but don’t need immediate support, the best thing you can do is to encourage them to talk to someone: a parent, school counsellor, teacher, doctor, or even eheadspace or their local Headspace Centre. If they are reluctant, it might help if you are able to go along with them to speak with someone.
Letting your friend know that you care and you want to support them can help them to feel less alone. It’s important that you also take care of yourself though, as it can be pretty stressful and overwhelming to carry such worries for a friend. In supporting your friend, you might want to help them come up with some ways to distract themselves until the suicidal thoughts pass or until they are able to talk to a professional about their suicidal thoughts.
Self care is really important for all concerned too. this link has more info on ways to look after yourself and why it's so important
thanks for you contribution today
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24th Aug, 9:33 am
Comment From Rachael hY NRG
Hey Tom, thanks so much for your question! I know it's scary to try and talk to someone about the first time. When i need to talk to someone, I call The Suicide Callback Service. I gave them a fake name, and my phone number. This service is really good because they keep key notes from previous conversations - so I don't have explain who I am, and whats going on in my life every time, they use my phone number to keep a brief record (it's all confidential!) so even thought it's a stranger I feel a little more confident in talking to them because they already know a bit about me. I would suggest callng them when you're feeling okay and telling them a bit about whats going on for you, so that when you're experiencing negative thoughts it's already set up for you! Check it out here https://www.suicidecallbackservice.org.au/
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
24th Aug, 9:33 am
Jo eheadspace: Great comment Rachael...thanks. I guess from our perspective too it is helpful to use your real name (even just your first name) just makes the interaction that little more personal :) it's all confidential here with us too :) and yeah, Suicide Call Back Suicide service is a great service to call if you're needing support
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
24th Aug, 9:33 am
Kristal eheadspace: We're coming to the end of our time - hYNRG guys did you want to send through some closing messages?
I'm just putting together some links and resources :)
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24th Aug, 9:33 am
Comment From chloe
my friend told me she wants to kill herself but made me swear not to tell anyone but im really worried she might do something really serious. what should i do to help her?
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
24th Aug, 9:34 am
Jessie eheadspace: Hey there Chloe,
Things are sounding really full on for your friend at the moment and I can really hear how much you want to help. You’re right to feel worried and this is too much for you to carry alone.
It’s important to share this with an adult in your life so that she can get the right support. If you’re ever worried about her safety you can also contact a crisis service like kids helpline or lifeline.
It can feel really awful to breach your friends privacy but her safety comes first. Please do make sure you look after yourself too. Here’s a like worth a read over: https://au.reachout.com/articles/my-friend-is-suicidal
Take care Chloe.
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24th Aug, 9:34 am
Comment From Rachael hY NRG
Hey Cathie, I'm glad to hear your son is doing better, and congrats on being such an awesome supportive parent! As a young person, I can tell you one thing we hate is being told whats best for us.. I would suggest asking your son what he needs from you, Having some suggestions is helpful (cause he might not know) but he'll be more comfortable coming to you for support once your both on the same page about what support he wants to recieve. I hope this helps!
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24th Aug, 9:34 am
Comment From Tiger
i just want to say that what you guys at eheadspace are doing is really great and helpful to a lot of people so thank you
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
24th Aug, 9:34 am
Kristal eheadspace: Thanks so much Tiger :)
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
24th Aug, 9:35 am
Kristal eheadspace: Like we’ve heard from a few people, most people would much prefer to hear about suicidal thoughts before you do anything to hurt yourself. It’s not uncommon to feel very alone and as though you can’t tell someone about your thoughts, but hopefully you’re feeling a little more informed and know where you can get support. Remember, suicidal thoughts are “just” thoughts. You do not have to act on them, and you can get support so that things improve and the thoughts go away or become more manageable.
I’m going to post a few links in that might be helpful to check out – we’ve also tried to include appropriate links throughout this chat which you’ve hopefully found helpful!
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
23rd Oct, 11:22 am
Kristal eheadspace: Links
For people seeking support after a suicide of a loved one these services may be helpful:
• Hope for Life (1300 467 354): A national telephone support and referral service specifically for people bereaved by suicide.
• GriefLine (03 9935 7400): GriefLine is a national free and confidential telephone counselling service for people affected by grief. Available 12 noon to 3am, seven days a week.
.http://supportaftersuicide.org.au/find-related-organisations contains a list of organisations, including support groups, around Australia offering support to people bereaved by suicide.
If you’re feeling suicidal these links may be helpful:
Using funding from Movember Beyond Blue and Monash University have created an app that helps you to create a safety plan so you’ve got it with you wherever you are. You can use the app to send a copy to the people you trust – your counsellor and your family and friends. You can watch a video about the app and download it here - https://www.beyondblue.org.au/get-support/beyondnow-suicide-safety-planning
https://www.suicidecallbackservice.org.au/resources/feeling-suicidal/ 1300 659 467 have some great information and offer phone and webchat counselling 24/7 (they’ve also introduced video counselling too)
https://www.lifeline.org.au/ 13 11 14 also offer great support by phone or webchat
More links as suggested by the suicide call back service -
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
24th Aug, 9:38 am
Kristal eheadspace: Next month we’re hosting a couple of group chats – 7th July we’ll be chatting with parents/older adults who want more information about cyber safety and 31st July we’ll be talking about staying healthy and self care. For more info about those keep checking this link:
Remember all our past group chats can be accessed here - https://eheadspace.org.au/get-help/eheadspace-group-chat-session/
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
24th Aug, 9:39 am
Jessie eheadspace: Great to chat with you all tonight. Thanks for all the great questions. Cya :)
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
24th Aug, 9:39 am
Lauren eheadspace: Thanks for all your questions guys! Hope you have a restful evening!
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
24th Aug, 9:39 am
sally eheadspace: Thanks for all your input everyone
Take care Sally :)
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
24th Aug, 9:39 am
Jo eheadspace: Night everyone and thanks for coming past and asking some really great questions...take care
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24th Aug, 9:39 am
Comment From Rachael hY NRG
Thanks everyone for joining, and sharing your experiences! I hope you found this helpful. Goodnight :)
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
24th Aug, 9:40 am
Lovely to chat... and thanks for sharing your questions, thoughts and feelings. Goodnight.
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
24th Aug, 9:40 am