eheadspace Group Chat
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Group Chat
coping with stress from the drought
December 5th 2019 @ 6:30pm AEDT
Dealing with stress from the drought can be really tough, it’s important to take time to check in and do things to look after yourself. If you’re looking after yourself than you’ll be in a better place to be able to support your family and community as well. Learn more about how to better cope with stress from the drought and connect with people who are going through something similar.
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 6:31 pm
Hi everyone and welcome to a very important group chat. My name is Emma, I’m one of the clinicians here at eheadspace. Thanks for joining us tonight to talk about how to look after yourself and support your community during extended periods of drought… a topic that is effecting ALL of Australia quite seriously at this time.
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 6:31 pm
We have a fabulous team of people to chat with tonight, bringing a wealth of knowledge and experience. I would like to introduce our awesome team of eheadspace clinicians… Susan, Shannon, Clare and Di.
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 6:32 pm
I am also thrilled to welcome
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 6:32 pm
Emma, headspace Youth National Reference Group (hYNRG)
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 6:33 pm
Mehmet and Jasmine, Headspace Peer Support Moderators
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 6:33 pm
Annie, Reach Out
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 6:33 pm
And we hope to be joined by
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 6:33 pm
Jason, our Headspace CEO
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 6:34 pm
Sharene, Headspace Family & Friends Reference Group
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 6:34 pm
Ben, The Naked Farmer
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 6:34 pm
Shortly I will ask everyone to introduce themselves and tell us a little about their connection to life in the country.
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 6:34 pm
Some participants will be joining us remotely, so there may be times where there’s a delay in their responses to your questions or comments.
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 6:35 pm
We always enjoy your questions and to see you encouraging and being supportive during these chats – so please feel free to do that tonight too! No question is too silly to ask… chances are, if you are thinking it, someone else is as well! You might also have ideas that we don’t mention or you may have experienced something similar to a topic being discussed…. so if you do, please let us know how you coped with it.
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 6:36 pm
As usual a couple of things before we start:
*When you submit your question it won't appear straight away
*Our team will be busy reading and preparing an answer to your question before it's posted live - we appreciate your patience!
*If we can't publish anything we'll let you know through a private message
*It’s really helpful if you can identify yourself with your name, or an alias, as it means we can more easily recognise any follow up comments from you and make sure we’re answering the right person
*It’s also helpful if you can pop your age in your question, sometimes there are different resources or support options available depending on age
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 6:37 pm
If I could now ask everyone to briefly introduce themselves and it would be great if you could tell us a little about your interest in the topic of droughts and/or connection to the country. Feel free to disclose as much or little as you feel comfortable.
Shannon eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 6:38 pm
Hey everyone! I’m Shannon, I’m one of the clinicians here at eheadspace. I was a country kid until I finished high school. I grew up in Southern NSW, and lived on properties during my childhood. I remember there being a drought throughout my teen years, it went for so long that it became a normalised part of life for us. I still have family that live in the country, and I’m looking forward to chatting with more country folks tonight too!
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 6:38 pm
Clare B
Moderator
5th Dec, 6:38 pm
My name is Clare and I grew up on a farm in North- East Victoria. My youngest brother is a fifth generation farmer and for many years we had Merino sheep before switching over to a South African breed of sheep called Dorpers - a decision we had to make partly because of their tendency to fare better in the arid, drought-like conditions that have become a reality for farms across Australia
Drought is undeniably devastating and impacts everyone in a farming community. I’m really looking forward to speaking with you all tonight. The stressful effects of drought can increase social isolation which is a contributing factor in developing depression and anxiety- making opportunities to connect really important.
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 6:40 pm
If participants feel comfortable to introduce themselves and tell us a little of your story that would be great too... only what you are comfortable with.
Susan eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 6:41 pm
Hello Everyone welcome to our web chat my Dad grew up farming (mainly cattle and sheep) in NSW he survived floods, fires and drought and I grew up hearing the brutal realities of farming. My dad left the family farm and became a mechanical engineer but we have always held a strong connection with the land and our rural heritage. I have a horse and have worked on a horse farm for a couple of years mid drought and although my experience is nothing compared to people who make a living on the land I too have spent hours worrying about the price of feed, the challenges of keeping the weight on animals and the despair that comes from staring at paddocks that are dry dustbowls with animals that are getting to be too thin not knowing when or if the farm is going to afford the next round of feed. I guess you'd say I can relate at least a little to some of the challenges people may talk about and of course am here ready to support and listen too!
Annie - ReachOut
Participant
5th Dec, 6:41 pm
Hey guys! I'm Annie and I'm from ReachOut. If you haven't heard of us we're a digital mental health service for young people and parents of teenagers (plus we have a Schools program too).
I'm the content manager at ReachOut and one of my big projects last year and this year has been working on the drought. We've produced a bunch of resources and personal stories to support people's mental health and wellbeing through the drought.
I reckon my fave one was hanging out with Ben (The Naked Farmer) at his farm in VIC and working with him to share his story :)
Jason headspace CEO
Participant
5th Dec, 6:41 pm
Hi everyone, I was keen to make it today for this chat to hear about all things youth mental health in the context of drought impacted communities. As someone who grew up in the country and seeing the impacts of drought I want to hear what people have to say in this chat. Thank you to our wonderful teams at headspace across the country for what you do to support our rural communities coping with the drought.
There is much to acknowledge about the resilience of communities during such times but I want you to know that we are one big community at headspace who care and want to do more to support.
m
Participant
5th Dec, 6:42 pm
Hi everyone. My name is Mem and I grew up on a fruit property in the Riverland which is near the SA and Vic border. I have been exposed to the effects of the drought throughout my childhood right into my teens. It's always a tricky time and I'm glad to be here tonight to share my experiences and also learn from others :)
jas12
Participant
5th Dec, 6:42 pm
Hi! I'm Jas and I'm one of the peer support moderators! I use she/her pronouns. I grew up in rural NT and QLD and have a family background in farming- I'm actually visiting them in NSW at the moment. I'm unfortunately quite familiar with bushfires and the impact they've had on my home community along with friends and family. It has huge impacts not only financially, but also on mental health- it can be isolating and contributes to a huge feeling of helplessness. I'm looking forward to hearing your experiences and strategies tonight!
Anonymous 3509
Participant
5th Dec, 6:43 pm
Hi guys.
Di eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 6:44 pm
Hi my name is Di my connection to the country was growing up in a small country town of 350 people, the closest township being 30kms away. The local farming community consisting of sheep farming, cattle and dairy farms. My father was a shearing contractor and shearer in our local community. Schooling was by (what always seemed) to be the longest bus route ever to our local secondary school. The community has its share of fires and tough times. Looking forward to chatting with you all
Anonymous 7201
Participant
5th Dec, 6:44 pm
Hello 👋 thank you for this chat and thinking of us. It’s so nice to know headspace cares. I go see a social worker at headspace and it’s been helpful. I wasn’t going because of the drought but it definitely comes up. My dad is so worried about everything and gets cranky. Mum reminds us to give him a break but it’s hard
Di eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 6:46 pm
Hi 7201, it is really great that you have been so honest to talk about what you and your family are going through ...its sounds like you have a very supportive mum who is looking out for all of you.
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 6:46 pm
Thankyou to everyone for joining us and showing your interest and support.
EmmaPJ
Participant
5th Dec, 6:46 pm
Hi everyone! My name is Emma and I work at headspace on the national youth reference group, also called hY NRG. I am based in central west NSW, in a small rural community called Blayney where my family have been running the rural merchandise store CRT for the past 25 years. Our family business has meant that we have had a hand in running and managing every local property within the district. This has also meant that we have also felt the impact of the drought on every local property, and the impact of family associated to that farm. When I was younger I had my own struggles with mental illness which also meant that my family had to drive more than 100km every day to visit me in hospital at the time so I am acutely aware of the impact of living in a rural community, and the current impact of the drought :))
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 6:46 pm
I’d like to begin by acknowledging the Wurundjeri people who are the Traditional Custodians of the land where our office is located. I would like to pay respect to Elders past, present, and emerging and their continuing connection to land, waters and culture. I’d also like to acknowledge the Traditional Custodians of the land from which you are accessing this chat from, and would like to pay my respect to their Elders past, present and emerging.
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 6:46 pm
The effects of droughts on all communities can be wearing, destructive and dire… And although Australia's first people have thrived on this country for thousands of years I would also like to acknowledge the serious impact that today’s droughts are having on many of our indigenous communities. Furthermore, I would like to reach out and offer our support to people within these communities.
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 6:47 pm
We’d really encourage you to find out about the Traditional Country you are on, so follow this link https://aiatsis.gov.au/explore/articles/aiatsis-map-indigenous-australia
Ben Brooksby ‘The Naked Farmer’
Participant
5th Dec, 6:47 pm
G’day all! My name is Ben Brooksby AKA The Naked Farmer. I’m a 5th generation farmer here in Western Victoria. I’m now 26 but growing up through my teen year I grew up through a decade long drought. I created The Naked Farmer to help get the conversation started in a very unique way, because hey we need to do what we can to get people to stop and take a time out for a chat. 👍
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 6:48 pm
HI Ben. Thanks for joining us.
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 6:48 pm
While you’re starting to think about and send through your questions, I thought it might be helpful to talk a little about drought, what causes drought, the impact of drought, how it impacts on mental health and what we hope to be covering tonight.
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 6:49 pm
Anonymous 7201
Participant
5th Dec, 6:49 pm
It’s so great seeing so many people here.
Di eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 6:50 pm
Hi 7201 yes totally agree with you and its so great to know that you are not doing this alone.
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 6:50 pm
WHAT IS DROUGHT?
Well, sounds like a simple question but I’m not sure that many of us really understand the complexity of its impact.
At its simplest, drought is when there is less rain than usual. This can lead to dry soil and dry rivers and dams. Less available water affects how well plants grow and how much animals have to eat, which means farmers have difficulty making money and providing for their families.
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 6:50 pm
Drought can also increase the risk or severity of bushfires.
Severe drought can mean that we run short of water to supply houses, towns or even cities. These droughts have been chronic and slow moving – there is no rest from the stress. Work is 24/7 365 days a year.
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 6:50 pm
When farmers have difficulty making money for a long time, the local and national economy can really suffer. The economy is basically the movement of money from person to person and business to business around a community or country.
Farmers have to buy expensive feed for their animals, food prices can rise, fewer people are employed in farming and the businesses and towns that are directly involved in farming can suffer.
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 6:51 pm
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 6:51 pm
WHAT CAUSES DROUGHT?
There are several possible causes of drought, the most common being lack of rain.
If an area upstream along a river system gets little rain that can cause a drought downstream.
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 6:52 pm
If it is hotter than usual, water evaporates (or dries up) faster than usual and the soil, rivers and water storage areas can dry out.
Dry ground in turn increases temperatures, leading to even more evaporation.
People sometimes refer to this as the drought cycle: when it is hot, evaporation increases, which dries the ground out, which makes it hotter, which increases evaporation and so on in a cycle.
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 6:52 pm
In all, as many are experiencing, the result is pretty terrible.
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 6:53 pm
Tonight we hope to give you plenty of information and ideas about looking after yourself, supporting your family and contributing to your community. We aim to explore healthy and sustainable coping mechanisms and we hope to bring more of Australia together to help support those directly suffering. And we also look forward to hearing what you have to say on the topic.
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 6:53 pm
Please feel free to start sending through any questions that you might have.
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 6:53 pm
We also have a competition that we would like to invite you to participate in… a few cool prizes to be won.
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 6:54 pm
If you'd like to enter our competition to win prizes from ReachOut, The Naked Farmer and headspace head to this link https://forms.gle/TzvkbmPQH9qc4oZ56
and fill in the form.
You'll need to tell us in 25 words or less what things you could do to maintain wellbeing and manage stress from the drought.
For more details about the prizes available check out the terms and conditions here https://headspace.org.au/assets/TsCs-DroughtGC.pdf
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 6:54 pm
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 6:56 pm
I will post a great video worth checking out while we start answering some of your questions.
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 6:56 pm
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 6:57 pm
I’m sure Ben will expand but for later reference here is a link to learn a bit more about Ben (the Naked Farmer) and his mission for rural mental health. https://www.thenakedfarmerco.com.au/about-us Or maybe start following him on Instagram.
Anonymous 7201
Participant
5th Dec, 6:57 pm
What are some things I can help my dad do to feel less stressed. We help out with chores etc but I think it would be good for him to do things like mindfulness but he’s not up for it
Di eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 6:57 pm
HI 7201, that is a really great question. Maybe just being around with him and sharing some of the really great times you all have had as a family and maybe the gentle reminder that he is not alone in this. That you are all there as a family for him, just like the times that he has been there for you.
Go through some old photos and revisit some of the things that you all used to enjoy....
Anonymous 7201
Participant
5th Dec, 6:57 pm
Ben, do you find many older men get involved or talk about how they feel when you visit?
Ben Brooksby ‘The Naked Farmer’
Participant
5th Dec, 6:58 pm
For us farmers one of the biggest things that have an impact on our mental health is finances. For us when we went through the 10 year drought I was at the age of 7-17 and I remember do clearly having to buy our clothes from op shops or get hand me downs from neighbours and friends. I remember having to always buy the essentials (no lollies or treats) and our 2minute shower rule. But hey could of been worse. At least we still had food, family and clothes on our backs 🤷 That had a huge impact on my dad (parents split up when I was 5) and in result us kids as well. I used to dread free dress day at school because my clothes were “branded clothes” the other kids at school would always remind me.
Susan eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 7:00 pm
Annie - ReachOut
Participant
5th Dec, 7:00 pm
Hi 7201, that's such a lovely thought. Another thing you could try is asking if the family could all have self-care time. You could all brainstorm things that you like to do then at a set time each day/week you get some time to do that thing. Often parents find it really hard to take the time out from their responsibilities at their jobs and with parenting but it's so important they chill out too. If he's not up for mindfulness maybe there's a podcast or fave band he could listen to whilst not doing anything else. Hope that helps :)
m
Participant
5th Dec, 7:01 pm
I just want to quickly share something that kind of addresses 7201's question. Our main harvest/labour period takes place in December-January. As much as it is a stressful time, it really helps us all come together to talk about some things that might get overlooked due to everyone's busy schedule. My dad is a mega stress-head but when I take the time to hear him out around what stresses him, it helps him to verbalise his thoughts.
Ben Brooksby ‘The Naked Farmer’
Participant
5th Dec, 7:02 pm
G’day 7201 Yes absolutely we have many farmers get involved and share their stories on our social media pages, it’s so powerful hearing their stories and I believe it really helps others in that same boat. On our recent tour of Tassie we had a number of farmers ranging as young as 19 to the age of 67 👍
Anonymous 7882
Participant
5th Dec, 7:02 pm
7201 it’s so hard when the adults around us maybe aren’t coping so well. I agree with Di that reminding him you’re there and that you appreciate him can help. I also think that making sure you’ve got community support, like catching up with mates, maybe having a regular get to gether with others can help to remember that you’re not alone. That helped my family, and kicking in together with the community for paddock parties where we had potluck and set up obstacle course and 3 legged or sack races. Just something free and easy to take your mind off things.
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 7:02 pm
Love that idea Anon7882
Jason headspace CEO
Participant
5th Dec, 7:03 pm
Emma and all, I want to get a sense of the conversations people are having about drought and the impact it maybe having on their wellbeing and their families and friends.
Susan eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 7:03 pm
I agree Jason! I am looking forward to hearing the ways that people are managing well being. Facing the drought and all the consequences of this is huge!
Di eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 7:03 pm
Ben that sounds like a really tough time that you all went through .How amazing it is in how far you have come since that time.
Are there things that you did that got you through that time that you would want to share with us tonight
Annie - ReachOut
Participant
5th Dec, 7:04 pm
7882, the paddock parties is such a good idea. I know Ben was telling me about bin-night dinners his community used to have. Ben, maybe you could explain them!
jas12
Participant
5th Dec, 7:04 pm
These are some great strategies for 7201! I find that genuinely expressing my appreciation for all that my family does can help them when things are tough - talking to some of my extended family there can be lots of pressure and acknowledging that they're doing a really great job despite the difficulties can go a long way :)
jas12
Participant
5th Dec, 7:04 pm
Thank you so much for all this information Emma! I think one of the big things I and people I know have struggled with is that feeling of helplessness - if there's one thing we can't control it's the weather but it can have such a big impact. Does anyone have any strategies when approaching things they can't control?
Anonymous 7201
Participant
5th Dec, 7:04 pm
🙏 thank you all. I hope he will want to get involved. Finances are tough, and Ben I definitely know what it’s like to wear hand me downs. My cousin who lives in the city just sent some stuff and there’s some great dresses in the bag that I’m excited to wear.
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 7:06 pm
Anonymous 7882
Participant
5th Dec, 7:07 pm
Hi! I wondered if some of the people here who have been through drought could talk about how they coped?
Annie - ReachOut
Participant
5th Dec, 7:08 pm
I'd love to hear about the different ways people have seen their communities come together in the face of the drought? Sometimes it can be really helpful hearing stories of resilience so you know you know how others get through things
EmmaPJ
Participant
5th Dec, 7:08 pm
Hi Anon7201 and anon7882! Taking on an emotionally supportive role during this time for your parents is incredibly difficult I know. At the moment our local farmers are doing a community dinner every two weeks where they can catch up and feel supported. This has worked really well so far as it connects everyone and gets people away from the farm for a few hours, there are lots of ways you can go about organising that but its a simple and affective activity to get going in the community :))
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 7:09 pm
Something really special about community spirit.
Ben Brooksby ‘The Naked Farmer’
Participant
5th Dec, 7:09 pm
Yes absolutely Di, something that we did as a small farming community every Wednesday night also known as ‘Bin night’ all my neighbours would take our bins to the same corner and then we would all go back to one of the neighbours houses and each of us would bring some type of dish for tea and desert. Every week we would look so forward to it! The adults will catch up for a drink and a yarn. It was a cheap way to feed us all and so much fun. So important to have a great network around you in times like drought and I truely believe this is one of the major parts that got us through that period.
Annie - ReachOut
Participant
5th Dec, 7:10 pm
jas12, a great way to approach things outside of your control is to try and find some acceptance around them (or sometimes people like using the word recognition). It's about going 'okay this thing is happening that I can't control and that's okay'. And then a next step can be finding some things that you can control, like maybe you're reaction to the situation, and working on that instead.
Di eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 7:10 pm
Ben that is the amazing that your community has been doing. Getting together and sharing amazing that is the best self care.
Susan eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 7:11 pm
m
Participant
5th Dec, 7:11 pm
Our property was our main source of income but when things got tough, we realised that we needed a backup plan financially. Especially when leasing water went through the roof. Dad picked up some work as a groundsman to ensure if things went down south we had something to fall back on. I know this might not be possible for everyone but it helped us alot.
Susan eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 7:13 pm
Hey M I am guessing that having the back up of your dad working as a groundsman would have helped ease the worry for your family I know that the financial stress can be really awful. My dad trained as a mechanic initially for this reason but for him when things got too intense and he had to walk away it became a career (turns out he's pretty gifted at it too!) tells me there is hope that even if the worst should happen and you need to walk away there are other options.
Anonymous 7201
Participant
5th Dec, 7:11 pm
Jason for us the affect is that everyone is so worried, it’s like the drought consumes us and so much of our time is spent thinking, talking or worrying about the drought and everything else it affects. My mum and dad always fight, my older brother always said he would farm but I don’t think he will he says it’s too hard but he doesn’t know what else he would rather do. A lot of my friends families are the same.
Shannon eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 7:12 pm
Hey Jas! It can be really tough to deal with things outside of our control. For me, I reckon a huge first step is actually acknowledging that it can't be controlled - sometimes we forget that, and scramble to find ways to change a situation! Getting to a point of acceptance about not being able to control something can be super powerful. From there, it's thinking of ways of 'how can I manage my own stress right now, and what steps can I take to alleviate some of the tough things I am dealing with'.
Annie - ReachOut
Participant
5th Dec, 7:12 pm
We've got a good article that explains this and steps you through it - https://au.reachout.com/articles/how-acceptance-can-help-you-cope-with-things-out-of-your-control
Anonymous 7882
Participant
5th Dec, 7:12 pm
Emma and Ben, those meals events are definitely things our community has been doing too. Paddock parties are events we grew up with, I remember being so excited about icy poles.
Ben Brooksby ‘The Naked Farmer’
Participant
5th Dec, 7:15 pm
That’s awesome 7882, was always my favourite time of the week.
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 7:15 pm
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 7:15 pm
Annie, would you like to tell us a little bit about the ReachOut Digital Drought Care Package that has been developed? https://au.reachout.com/collections/dealing-with-stress-from-the-drought
jas12
Participant
5th Dec, 7:15 pm
Amazing, thank you for these resources! I find it so valuable that people living in the more central/non-farming area also getting behind our farmers, whether it be putting together fundraisers or heading out and providing support. The toughest of times can bring together our wide communities in the strongest way
Anonymous 7882
Participant
5th Dec, 7:17 pm
Annie I think you mentioned earlier about having self care events. Has anyone got anything like that happening? We’ve done some sleep overs with friends to paint our nails, put on face masks and watch movies. That’s been fun too. Not specifically for the drought, but I guess it’s helped with that stress.
Susan eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 7:17 pm
Anon 7882 I LOVE this idea!
Anonymous 3509
Participant
5th Dec, 7:17 pm
I feel really overwhelmed about how much my parents are struggling. I’ve never seen them like this before. They are usually just do strong and focused. And never let stuff get them down. What can I do to help them.
Clare B
Moderator
5th Dec, 7:18 pm
Hi 3509,
I’m sorry to hear that you and your parents are struggling at the moment. People in regional and rural communities have a bit of a reputation for being resilient and hardy. However the stress associated with coping with a natural disaster like a drought can wear down even the most strong and focused of individuals.
One thing that you might consider is encouraging your parents to talk with others about what they are going through- it could be a friend, another farmer of maybe a health professional. Talking can help to release built up tension and make you feel less alone.
Susan eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 7:22 pm
Watching your parents struggle can be really hard especially if you haven't seen them like that before. I think adults like anyone can end up feeling like they are letting their loved ones down when they cant provide for their family like they did the the past. Something small but powerful can be to give them a huge hug or to say directly to them the things that you love and value about them. Knowing you are loved no matter what is a pretty universal thing I reckon!
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 7:22 pm
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 7:22 pm
Annie - ReachOut
Participant
5th Dec, 7:22 pm
Yeah sure Emma :)
As we've heard tonight (and all see) the drought can have a really big impact on the mental health and wellbeing of entire communities. We wanted to put a bunch of resources together that could support people through this tough time. We worked with the Centre for Rural and Remote Mental Health and a bunch of awesome farmers and people living in regional areas to work out what people needed. We cover things like how to help a friend, how to cope with the stress yourself, why talking is helpful, what different support services are out there and a bunch more. All the resources are free and available anonymously, and we have a care package for parents too.
Anonymous 3509
Participant
5th Dec, 7:22 pm
Thanks helps Clare B! xx
jas12
Participant
5th Dec, 7:21 pm
Encouraging discussion is so important. There's the stereotype that farmers are meant to be strong and stoic all the time but we all know how useful talking through our struggles can be and this is no different
EmmaPJ
Participant
5th Dec, 7:22 pm
Hey 7882! As a community I know that the local school in trundle has put in showers and washing machines so that everyone in the community can access a place for a shower before work and school and can get some of their clothes washed during the week. I know its a simple and not a 'self care event' as such, but its been a really important addition to everyone in the community :))
Annie - ReachOut
Participant
5th Dec, 7:22 pm
7882, it also doesn't have to be a big organised event. it could be that the family all agree that at 5pm you take 20 minutes to yourselves to do something nice like read a book, go for a run, game or anything. And it's set time every day (or it could be weekly) that you just look after you! I know lots of people experiencing the drought find it hard to take this time, that's why scheduling it and making it short and achievable can be a great way to get started.
Annie - ReachOut
Participant
5th Dec, 7:25 pm
Emma, yes the school in Trundle is doing amazing things! They're really making the school a centrepoint for community support which is so lovely to see
Jenny
Participant
5th Dec, 7:25 pm
I am in my final year of school next year and was at a boarding school in Brisbane, which I loved. My parents can’t afford it any more so I have been shipped back to my families estate to work and home school. I hate it. And I am worried I am not going to do well. How can I get my parents to see the impact this is having on me and my future?
Shannon eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 7:25 pm
Hi Jenny,
Thanks for your question! It sounds like you’re in for a really big adjustment! I imagine it would be really tough to have a total change to your education, your social life, your accommodation…it’s a lot to be dealing with at once. Based on what you’ve described, it sounds like your parents might be going through a rough time when it comes to finances as well. So there’s strain on the whole family.
Having a conversation with your parents about the challenges you are facing at the moment is a really wise idea, Jenny. Supporting one another through these tough times is so important. It’s usually helpful to plan out what you want to say to them, and also think about what you’re hoping for from the conversation – for example, do you want them to acknowledge your position, or to offer solutions? Do you want to check in with them about how they’re finding the new arrangement too? Planning it our means that you can edit and re-write until you’ve got everything that you want included. Then, it’s a matter of choosing when is the best time to chat with them. You could also consider whether a face-to-face conversation will work best, or whether you’d prefer another option instead, like a letter.
I have a couple of resources here to help you plan out your conversation with them. Check them out here:
We previously had a group chat on communication that you can find here: https://headspace.org.au/eheadspace/group-chat/communication-and-assertiveness/
And ReachOut has some great communication resources as well: https://au.reachout.com/mental-fitness/communication-skills
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 7:26 pm
Anonymous 7882
Participant
5th Dec, 7:26 pm
Jason is there more that headspace can do? We are over an hour from our centre and we would love to have people come out and visit us.
Anonymous 7882
Participant
5th Dec, 7:26 pm
Or Annie, is there help from ReachOut?
Clare B
Moderator
5th Dec, 7:27 pm
Hi 7882,
eheadspace is a service that can support you, we originally launched our online and phone service to reach regional and remote young people who were unable to access a headspace centre. We provide free support and counselling to young people 12-25 and their families and friends. Here is some more information about what we do… https://headspace.org.au/eheadspace/ :)
jas12
Participant
5th Dec, 7:29 pm
Hi Jenny! That sounds really challenging to deal with, it's a bit down the track but if you do feel this is impacting your potential to do well/go onto university or other plans I would recommend looking at special consideration options. Not necessarily a mental health strategy but might put your mind at ease in the coming months that the impact of the drought on your studies may be recognised
Anonymous 7201
Participant
5th Dec, 7:29 pm
Hi Jenny, that would be hard. I think it’s hard to imagine how it is because I’ve always gone to the area school. I’m guessing like Shannon that it was cos your parents could afford it? That sucks because there’s not much anyone can do about it. Have you got local friends?
Jenny
Participant
5th Dec, 7:30 pm
Some and they are great, but I really miss my city life. I'm sure I'll be fine. It's just a little tough to take at this time.
Susan eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 7:31 pm
Annie - ReachOut
Participant
5th Dec, 7:31 pm
Hey 7882, in terms of support from ReachOut whilst we don't provide one-on-one/face-to-face support we do have an amazing peer support community. You can head there anytime and get support from other young people (there's a parents one too) about any issue - whether it's the drought, life as a young person in the country, or break-ups and bullying. It's all professionally moderated (kind of like this groupchat) but there are thousands of young people to talk about how they get through tough times and provide support. It's a pretty awesome space.
here's a link to the community: https://forums.au.reachout.com/
Anonymous 7882
Participant
5th Dec, 7:32 pm
Oh cool thanks Annie!
Anonymous 7882
Participant
5th Dec, 7:32 pm
Thank you Clare b - there’s always a long wait for Eheadspace though 😭
m
Participant
5th Dec, 7:34 pm
7882 we have community chats as part of the eheadspace program, kind of similar to this one. We would love to have you where you can talk to us as the peer moderators :))
Clare B
Moderator
5th Dec, 7:34 pm
I hear you 7882, it can be really tough to play the waiting game. Just remember that it’s a bit like waiting for a doctor in a face to face clinic.. Maybe you can keep yourself entertained by watching some tik tok videos :) You can also send us in an email or even give us a call- often it’s a shorter wait time for phone support :)
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 7:34 pm
Just another reminder about our competition.
If you'd like to enter our competition to win prizes from ReachOut, The Naked Farmer and headspace head to this link https://forms.gle/TzvkbmPQH9qc4oZ56 and fill in the form.
You'll need to tell us in 25 words or less what things you could do to maintain wellbeing and manage stress from the drought.
For more details about the prizes available check out the terms and conditions here https://headspace.org.au/assets/TsCs-DroughtGC.pdf
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 7:34 pm
Anonymous 7882
Participant
5th Dec, 7:35 pm
Oh wow, I didn’t know that m. Sounds cool!
m
Participant
5th Dec, 7:36 pm
Jas and I are apart of it and we cover some great content whilst talking about things in a way that young people might not have considered previously. Even I have learnt so much from others.
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 7:37 pm
Anonymous 5971
Participant
5th Dec, 7:37 pm
Hi 👋 can you please explain why talking about stress helps? I think it would make me more stressed to focus more energy on it
Di eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 7:37 pm
Hi 5971, that is such a great question ...
I think that normalising how you are feeling, by talking about it is such a validating thing to do. It then gives you permission to name the emotion and so that you can then work on ways to manage the stress. Sharing the emotion and thoughts with others can be really validating. Giving yourself permission to do some self care, deep breathing or doing something that gives you a sense of calm.
That the stress can be something that can be worked on it just takes some time to find out what is going to work for you in managing stress when it pops up...sitting with what you know you can control and let the stuff go that you have no control of
Annie - ReachOut
Participant
5th Dec, 7:37 pm
Susan eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 7:37 pm
Here is the link to the Spaces (peer moderated) group chat on general coping https://headspace.org.au/eheadspace/group-chat/psm-general-coping
Susan eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 7:38 pm
and here is the Spaces (peer moderated chat) about managing relationships https://headspace.org.au/eheadspace/group-chat/psm-navigating-relationships/
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 7:39 pm
How do you think city folk can help?
Anonymous 7882
Participant
5th Dec, 7:41 pm
Buy a bale! They deliver bales of hay to farmers, we haven’t got any yet but I think they’re waiting to get more of the farmers in the area registered
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 7:41 pm
‘Buy a Bale’ Phone: 1300 327 624
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 7:42 pm
m
Participant
5th Dec, 7:42 pm
Encouraging city folk to buy local and support farmer's markets etc.
Anonymous 7882
Participant
5th Dec, 7:42 pm
👍 👍
EmmaPJ
Participant
5th Dec, 7:42 pm
City folk can help by supporting #buyfromthebush and "ladies of the land" this Christmas :))
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 7:43 pm
Shannon eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 7:43 pm
I reckon city folk can help out by offering financial aid in whatever way will help, particularly by buying local and looking in to other ways of supporting the farmers with donations
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 7:43 pm
I think for me the idea of taking a really long drive… visiting the country… seeing these amazing spaces and places… eating in a tiny rural café … smiling at people at are having such hard times… buying delicious fresh vegies from a farmers super long driveway… buying petrol from a small one pump roadside station and making an effort to step outside of our own insular little worlds. I know its small but I find it certainly helps me to connect and grasp a glimpse of how different our worlds are and how tough things might be for others.
Annie - ReachOut
Participant
5th Dec, 7:44 pm
City folk can plan holidays around towns that have been affected - spend in local businesses and tourism.
You can volunteer your time.
You can also make sure you're checking in on friends or family that live in drought-affected areas
Hold a fundraiser for a community with your mates.
Lots of ways city folk can get involved and help out!
Di eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 7:44 pm
Hi there something that I have recently heard about for women on the farms that we city folk can promote people to participate in supporting
There is a great female farmer that goes by Fierce Female Farmers website/facebook page , and they are arranging packages for rural women , things like deodorant, sanitary products, wipes and hand cream.
jas12
Participant
5th Dec, 7:44 pm
Definitely farmer's markets and I would hugely recommend considering rural Australia when planning a road trip or holiday for the summer! Whether it's stopping in at a bakery, buying from markets or supporting other businesses
Ben Brooksby ‘The Naked Farmer’
Participant
5th Dec, 7:45 pm
Couldn’t agree more m, I think it’s imporant for city and country folk to buy Australian made produce and not particularly major supermarket brands if possible. This will filter back into farmers pockets and have a good appreciation for what our Aussie farmers do to us all 👍
Susan eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 7:45 pm
I like this idea! I know that supermarket brands don't filter back the money to farmers that well but is there some way that we can be sure that the products we buy do?
Anonymous 7882
Participant
5th Dec, 7:46 pm
Do people in the city conserve water too? I don’t know if that helps? I know my cousins who live a while from us have had to cart water out to their homestead
Di eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 7:46 pm
Buying from the farm gate is also a really great way of supporting rural communities.
Annie - ReachOut
Participant
5th Dec, 7:47 pm
GIVIT is also really great and recommended by the folk at RAHMP and CCRMH :)
Clare B
Moderator
5th Dec, 7:47 pm
Hey 7882 I think it’s really important for all of us to be mindful of our water consumption. A few ways of doing this as city folk are taking shorter showers, watering the garden when the sun has gone down, and turn the tap off when you’re brushing your teeth :)
jas12
Participant
5th Dec, 7:49 pm
Some communities also have specific drought appeals so it might be worth looking at supporting those as well!
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 7:49 pm
Ben Brooksby ‘The Naked Farmer’
Participant
5th Dec, 7:50 pm
Something that we did here at The Naked Farmer we had a campaign called “dob in a Farmer” where we had people don in their neighbours or family and we raised over $38,000 and we have given that money straight back to these farming families in many different ways. It’s been truely incredible!
Annie - ReachOut
Participant
5th Dec, 7:50 pm
So good Ben!
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 7:50 pm
Awesome effort Ben.
Anonymous 5912
Participant
5th Dec, 7:51 pm
I’m from the country but go to uni in the city. I just feel so frustrated by how thoughtless some of my uni friends are about the impact of these droughts. It’s like they just don’t know how bad it is for people and that it will actually effect them. How can I manage my wanting to yell at them every time it’s talked about.
Di eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 7:51 pm
Hi 5912 I understand from what you have said that would be really frustrating hearing some of those comments. This would be especially hard when you are fully aware of the impact of drought is having on people from your community.
Sometimes it can be hard for our metro friends that have limited understanding of rural communities and life to understand what is going on in the country. You mentioned that you are at uni, maybe one way of raising an awareness is through any social or sporting groups that you might be involved in. If you are not involved in any of those groups maybe you could bring this up at social well being group or the equivalent.
I find that it can be really helpful to share some information about what is happening in daily life in a very measured way. Sometimes this can be really thought provoking for people to consider.
Maybe another thing you could do with your friends know that you were wanting to organise a small fund raising for say rural women. I am not sure if you saw the recent post about the Fierce Female Farmer.
Get them to check out Fierce Female Farmers website/facebook page around arranging packages for rural women , things like deodorant, sanitary products, wipes and hand cream.
Get them to do some research on how much of the rural community is affected.
That is a great way to get your friends on board and perhaps change their understanding of how tough things can be in rural communities
Anonymous 7882
Participant
5th Dec, 7:52 pm
Annie those reach out pictures are good. I liked the one before because it felt like I could have answered some of the questions like what are the good things about being a country chick
Anonymous 5912
Participant
5th Dec, 7:52 pm
Thanks heaps Di.
jas12
Participant
5th Dec, 7:56 pm
I'm in a very similar situation 5912! I think social media can be super useful along with sharing your own experiences in a non-accusatory way :)
Anonymous 1374
Participant
5th Dec, 7:56 pm
We proactively manage for drought every year, we live in less than 350mm rainfall country so we farm in drought constantly. We prioritise minimising disease and maximising water retention and try to have feed to hand. It’s such an investment and preparation helps but it doesn’t take away the ongoing worry and feeling of failure when things happen that are outside your control. I’d like some practical solutions to manage the worry as “knowing” we’ve done everything we can just doesn’t take it away.
Susan eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 7:56 pm
Welcome to our web chat and thank you for your question. In reading your description of all the intelligent steps you have been taking to prepare for and manage the challenges of farming in country that gets such little annual rainfall it was clear to me that you are someone who is highly experienced and very much focused on ensuring as best you can that your efforts succeed. You are absolutely right, there are so many things that are simply outside of our control and just knowing that you have done everything you can isn’t always enough to take that worry way.
Some practical steps to help manage the awful feelings that keep coming up for you are firstly to allow yourself permission to feel everything and to express your emotions as best you can and if possible turn to other people you can trust and can talk openly to about the worry and the failure. Just knowing that you are not alone and that there are other people who are going through this with you can make a big difference.
It is also important to take a bit of a look at your life to see if you are getting enough space away from the pressure and stress of work. Farming can often become a life encompassing thing where all you are is a farmer battling to farm in a drought. Getting lost in this role is sometimes very necessary but it is also essential to do things that remind you of the other parts of yourself. You are most likely laughing at this point but even if it is just taking 15 minutes to sit with a loved one where you chat about a past adventure you have had or (even better). A key part of managing the feelings of failure is knowing that you are more than your farm and have value, importance and identity outside of this.
Finally thought that I would share with you the story of a man that I really admire. His name was Viktor Frankl, he was a neurologist and psychiatrist who survived a concentration camp. Through his experience of living through unthinkable circumstances that were entirely outside of his control (similar in a way to yourself) he hit upon the realisation that “when we are no longer able to change a situation we are challenged to change ourselves” He noticed that “between stimulus and response there is space and in that space is our power to choose our response.” That response, choosing our attitude to the uncontrollable is sometimes the only thing we have the power to do. With this in mind I would challenge you to something really hard- taking a moment between stimulus (living and working in a drought) and response (worry, feeling like a failure). At first that space will pass so quickly you won’t have time to choose but with practice the space will grow and you will have more of an opportunity to choose what to do. For example: maybe reframe or challenge your thoughts, remind yourself of who you are outside of farming, do an activity that makes you feel more peaceful, distracts you or gives you a laugh. Yes these moments of relief may be brief but they are moments of freedom that when put together build resilience.

Jason headspace CEO
Participant
5th Dec, 7:56 pm
Thanks so much for all of this fab info tonight. I love to fill up the tank in a rural servo, buy from a country bakery and read the local paper. Holidaying in rural Australia, especially when you know it is really helping the local economy just makes it even better.
Annie - ReachOut
Participant
5th Dec, 7:56 pm
Aw thanks 7882! You can actually order postcards and other resources of them on our website. That can be another good way to give support to others in the community.
EmmaPJ
Participant
5th Dec, 7:57 pm
Hi anon5912. I was in that exact position last year and some of my peers nearly drove me up the wall. The most effective thing I think I did all year was actually bring some of my city friends back home to work on the farm for the week. It started as a novelty for most of them but by the end of the week they all had an entirely different perspective on what it was like :)) That may be a little extreme, but its very hard for people to wrap their head around it if they haven't been immediately impacted by it as its so far from what many people consider normal.
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 7:58 pm
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 7:58 pm
What do you wish your family knew about how this is for you?
m
Participant
5th Dec, 7:59 pm
Thanks for Sharing that Susan, I think my family get bogged down in this idea that the farm defines them and they should feel a certain way during certain points in the harvest. I'll definitely be using that information to challenge some of their automatic negative thoughts.
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 8:01 pm
And what do you think all Australians should know about the drought?
Anonymous 7882
Participant
5th Dec, 8:03 pm
Bakery’s are the best jasoN. Good old snot blocks!
Susan eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 8:06 pm
Snot blocks are my measuring stick for how good a bakery is anon 7882! 😊😊
jas12
Participant
5th Dec, 8:06 pm
I think all Australians should be aware of just how important farmers are for our ability to function - it is all too often those not involved take the food on their tables, clothes on our backs etc etc for granted. It's easy to complain about rising food prices etc without realising the drought behind it and the people who are struggling because of it
Anonymous 7882
Participant
5th Dec, 8:06 pm
Wow Susan. I don’t know if I understood that properly but I’m going to copy it and send it to my dad. I don’t think we were as prepared as 1374 is and I agree m that farm work gets to be the only thing we think about or do.
Susan eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 8:06 pm
Thanks M and Anon 7882 I am really glad that my answer is something that could help your families out. it can be hard when you are right in the middle of things but remembering who else you are can be a good way to shift things for a bit :)
Shannon eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 8:06 pm
All that info that Emma posted at the start of the chat is a great starting point - I think a lot of people don't quite comprehend the significant impact of drought, and how chronic it is
Annie - ReachOut
Participant
5th Dec, 8:06 pm
That our rural communities are incredibly resilient and strong!
Anonymous 7882
Participant
5th Dec, 8:06 pm
I think everyone should know it’s happening and how bad it is. And I wish that city people would adopt a farmer and either visit and help out a bit so they can see more about what’s happening or even just have a chat so we can all learn from each other. Maybe even a pen pal or email pal. I was just looking at the naked farmer on Instagram and I think it might be interested for my dad. I might going to show him that to
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 8:06 pm
I love love love the pen pal idea. 7882 awesome ideas.
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 8:06 pm
Last reminder about our competition. Here are the details.
If you'd like to enter our competition to win prizes from ReachOut, The Naked Farmer and headspace head to this link https://forms.gle/TzvkbmPQH9qc4oZ56
and fill in the form.
You'll need to tell us in 25 words or less what things you could do to maintain wellbeing and manage stress from the drought.
For more details about the prizes available check out the terms and conditions here https://headspace.org.au/assets/TsCs-DroughtGC.pdf
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 8:07 pm
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 8:08 pm
Anonymous 7882
Participant
5th Dec, 8:08 pm
I agree Annie, our community is fighting so hard and trying to be there for each other.
EmmaPJ
Participant
5th Dec, 8:09 pm
Anon7882 adopt a farmer is such a wholesome idea wow
Anonymous 7882
Participant
5th Dec, 8:10 pm
Like adopt a highway 🛣
Di eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 8:11 pm
Another quick reminder of something we did here at national office.Maybe organising a fund raiser we did , Flanney for a farmer....the team donated a gold coin , the team was really on board to support the farming community and money raised obviously went out to the farming community ...hay bales...it really got us all thinking about the rural communities
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 8:12 pm
I think it is worth highlighting here that Lifeline have also developed a drought toolkit so take a look when you have a moment.
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 8:12 pm
Before we finish up I think it might be nice for us all to acknowledge some of the really beautiful things that we still get to experience within country life and our country communities…and take this away with us as well as the incredibly creative ideas that have been suggested.
Anonymous 7882
Participant
5th Dec, 8:15 pm
Big open skies, and the stars at night. It was so weird going to Brisbane and not seeing the stars!
Susan eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 8:17 pm
I love that when I’m out in the paddock with my horse and its late afternoon and the light is all golden and she’s right there next to me and everything feels still and peaceful. Also the stars, have to second you Anon7882 those big open skies filled with stars awe inspiring! For me these little moments are the best self care out there!
jas12
Participant
5th Dec, 8:18 pm
Thank you all for a fantastic discussion! Whether through a bit of smog or on a clear day I'm still blessed to see the sun rising over my community, reminding me of the hope of another day
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 8:18 pm
Annie - ReachOut
Participant
5th Dec, 8:18 pm
My acknowledgement: I attended the Band Together Farmers concert in Parkes at the end of last year and it was really beautiful getting to hang out with thousands of farmers and their families and see a community come together in such a huge way.
Shannon eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 8:18 pm
What a lovely way to finish up the chat! My folks still live in the country, and I love visiting the area. The landscape is stunning, even when things aren't looking as green or lush as we would like. I love seeing our native wildlife as well. The sense of community is always something to look forward to as well - country people are some of the friendliest and most genuine going around!
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 8:19 pm
For me the experience of escaping the city and interacting with really lovely down to earth people is by far the highlight. It helps me to recognise what is really important in life. A community spirit... a sense that everyone belongs and just the notion that everyone is a mate. I love it.
Di eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 8:19 pm
I just want to acknowledge the uplifting power of being in the countr. I have lived country then city. The joy for me of going back to my roots in the country and being able to have conversations with people that might be doing it tough and supporting the local community is really important to me.
My mother always used to say that if you do not support what is in your town then you will loose it.. I really dont want to see that happen....
Sending you all a great warm hug for being so honest and real in sharing the most amazing stories no matter how tough things have been...
m
Participant
5th Dec, 8:19 pm
I love the views and the serenity of the Riverland (my region) as well as the fresh produce and amazing conversations you can have with the locals. I like to think the resilience I have been able to develop as a country boy is hard to find. Thank you to everyone who made this chat possible. There are definitely some things I have picked up around focusing on what is in your control and being able to adapt to different situations. It's so important to start those tough conversations because it is ok to not be ok. Take care everyone and feel free to join us in our community chats :)) Mem
Di eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 8:20 pm
Thanks m
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 8:20 pm
Clare B
Moderator
5th Dec, 8:20 pm
I totally agree Shannon…something I really appreciated about growing up in the country is feeling like I was a part of a community. There is something incredibly special about that feeling of connectedness –especially when you are doing it tough..
Anonymous 7882
Participant
5th Dec, 8:20 pm
I’m very grateful for my family and the values farming has given me. Even though I don’t think I will always live in my community I appreciate how close like an extended family it is. I’m so proud to see us coming together to support each other.
Ben Brooksby ‘The Naked Farmer’
Participant
5th Dec, 8:21 pm
Thanks legends, its been an honour to be apart of this discussion and shows that we are all in this together and always here to talk and help in anyway we can 💙
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 8:21 pm
Guys these responses have been seriously moving. Just shows what incredible strength everybody has to work with.
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 8:21 pm
Thank you so much for joining us tonight to chat about the difficulties faced throughout drought, to support each other and to explore the ways in which as an entire community we can cope with this ongoing struggle. I hope you’ve found the chat helpful.
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 8:22 pm
If you would like to carry on this discussion after this group chat closes you can join the ReachOut Drought forum https://forums.au.reachout.com/t5/Getting-Real-sessions/SLOW-MO-GR-All-About-the-Drought-11-17-Feb/m-p/344609
This is an ongoing forum so anyone that may not have been able to join our chat and is accessing this later this is a great way to contribute.
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 8:23 pm
If you feel overwhelmed, distressed or alone, it might be a good idea to seek some further support. You could talk to a trusted adult or think about visiting a counsellor through your school/uni counsellor, your GP or headspace. For more information about your local headspace Centre you can use this link -
If you have any concerns about your immediate safety, please contact 000.
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 8:25 pm
ACT:
ACT Mental Health Triage
Call: 1800 629 354 or 6205 1065
24/7 telephone service that can help with admin, info, assessment and referral for mental health concerns.
New South Wales:
NSW Mental Health Line
Call: 1800 011 511
Northern Territory:
NT Mental Health Line
Call: 1800 682 288
24/7 telephone service that can help with admin, info, assessment and referral for mental health concerns.
Queensland:
Queensland Mental Health Telephone Triage Service
Call: 1300 642 255
NQ Connect
Call: 1300 059 625
Available to people in Northern Queensland
They’re for people aged 15 and over. They’re available 24/7.
Counselling, support, information & discussion forums
South Australia:
Rural & Remote Distance Consultation, Emergency Triage & Liaison Service
Call: 13 14 65
24/7 telephone service that can help with admin, info, assessment and referral for mental health concerns.
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 8:25 pm
Tasmania:
Tasmanian Mental Health Service Helpline
Call: 1800 332 388
24/7 telephone service that can help with admin, info, assessment and referral for mental health concerns
RAW (Rural Alive & Well Inc.)
Call: 1300 HELP MATE (1300 4357 6283)
A not-for-profit organisation that provides free and confidential outreach support for rural Tasmanians. RAW outreach workers can come to you, or you can talk on the phone. They can provide info, give support and link you to other services.
Western Australia:
Mental Health Emergency Response Line
Call: 1300 555 788 (Metro)
Call: 1800 676 822 (Peel)
Rurallink Call: 1800 552 002
Samaritans Crisis Line Call: 135 247
Youthline Call: 08 9388 2500
Country callers: 1800 198 313
Victoria:
Psychiatric triage
Call: 1300 874 243
24/7 telephone service that can help with admin, info, assessment & referral for mental health concerns.
Anonymous 7882
Participant
5th Dec, 8:25 pm
Jason it’s also cool to see a ceo in something like this, very unexpected!
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 8:25 pm
Totally agree 7882
Jason headspace CEO
Participant
5th Dec, 8:26 pm
A big thanks to all the people who take time and care for those with mental health challenges or experiencing loneliness and isolation in rural Australia. From the bloke on the farm up the road who checks on his mate through to the families, carers, sporting clubs, health workers, school teachers, volunteers and emergency services. Also to people and organisations like the Naked Farmer (nice work Ben!), Reach Out, Indigenous organisations, headspace and young people who support each other when times are tough. Thank you all.
Annie - ReachOut
Participant
5th Dec, 8:26 pm
Thanks for having me and for everybody's great questions and insightful ideas, definitely some food for thought for tomorrow when I get in to work!
Susan eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 8:26 pm
It was such a joy to be part of this group chat! Thank you all for participating and being so supportive to one another. There really is so much strength in community!
Clare B
Moderator
5th Dec, 8:27 pm
Thanks so much guys for all of your thoughtful contributions tonight - was an absolute pleasure to chat with you all . Please keep reaching out for support it is a brave and important thing to do :)
Anonymous 7882
Participant
5th Dec, 8:27 pm
Thank you so much. It really is so encouraging to see that you all care. I’m going to check out those spaces and more of the reach out stuff. And Ben I’m looking forward to more of your posts too. You’ve got a new gollower!
Shannon eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 8:27 pm
Lovely chatting with you all tonight! It was really wonderful seeing all the support going around, and has helped me as a clinician as well. Take care everyone!
EmmaPJ
Participant
5th Dec, 8:27 pm
Thank you everyone who has contributed! How lucky are we to live in such beautiful communities?! Take care of yourselves and your families :))
Di eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 8:27 pm
Thanks again to all of your participation tonight it has been amazing... great work everyone it has really amazing.
jas12
Participant
5th Dec, 8:29 pm
Thank you everyone and all the best! I've really enjoyed hearing about everyone's strength tonight
Emma eheadspace
Moderator
5th Dec, 8:29 pm
Thank you so much guys. I I really hope that we can review this chat and collate a solid resource for everyone to access. Brilliant ideas. Take Care.