eheadspace Group Chat
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Group Chat
All about feeling anxious
March 26th 2017 @ 7pm AEDT
Anxiety is a normal response to something dangerous or stressful. Everyone feels some anxiety at different times in life. It’s the way our body tries to keep us out of dangerous situations, and motivates us to solve problems. It becomes a problem when it gets in the way of everyday life. Anxiety is so common, chances are that if you’re not struggling with it, someone you know or love probably is.

If you’re worried you have anxiety and would like to talk about ways to manage it, or you think that someone you care about is struggling it’s good to know how you can help them cope.
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
27th Aug, 11:04 am
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
27th Aug, 11:05 am
Kristal eheadspace: Hi everyone :) my name is Kristal and I’ll be facilitating our group chat tonight! Tonight we’re wanting to be available to answer all your questions about anxiety, whether those questions are about anxiety in general and wanting to know more so you can support someone else or about your own experience of anxiety.
Anxiety is more than just feeling stressed or worried. While stress and anxious feelings are a common response to a situation where we feel under pressure, they usually pass once the stressful situation has passed, or ‘stressor’ is removed. Anxiety is when these anxious feelings don't go away – when they're ongoing and happen without any particular reason or cause. It’s a serious condition that makes it hard to cope with daily life. Everyone feels anxious from time to time, but for someone experiencing anxiety, these feelings aren't easily controlled. Anxiety is very common, on average 1 in 4 people will suffer from anxiety at some stage. It’s also one of the 2 most common mental health struggles for young people under 25. Anxiety is common, but the sooner people with anxiety get help, the more likely they are to recover.
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
27th Aug, 11:05 am
Kristal eheadspace: While you start writing up some thoughts and questions I’ll quickly introduce to you the people you’ll be chatting with. From eheadspace we have: Clair, Jody, Emma, Rob, Sally and myself. We will also be joined by Charlie and Honoree who are members of the headspace Youth National Reference Group (hY NRG), as they’re joining remotely there may be times where their replies are delayed.
We’ve really enjoyed seeing you talking with each other in these chats, encouraging each other and being supportive – feel free to do that tonight too! You might have ideas that we don’t mention, or you may have experienced something similar and you can let us know how you coped with it. It’s helpful if you use a name (even if it’s not your real one) as it helps the conversation flow.
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
27th Aug, 11:05 am
Emma eheadspace: Hi guys. I'm Emma. Looks like it could be a really interesting chat tonight.
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27th Aug, 11:05 am
Comment From Guest
Hey guys, my name is Charlie! Really looking forward to chatting to you guys tonight. I'm also a headspace youth advocate and national youth reference group (hY NRG) member. I'm really happy to talk about my own experiences getting help with my anxiety and OCD. It was a tough time but getting help was the best thing I ever did for myself. I didn't access a headspace centre, but there was one less than a kilometre down the road which I didn't know about. I wish I had known earlier about places to go for help like you all have by logging on tonight.
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
27th Aug, 11:05 am
Sal eheadspace: Hi there everyone Sally here, looking forward to hearing for you all tonight :)
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:05 am
Rob eheadspace: Hi guys, my name is Rob. Glad to see you could make it to the chat.
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:05 am
Jody eheadspace: Hi I'm Jody, Looking forward to reading some interesting questions tonight!
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:06 am
Kristal eheadspace: This is a video of a song created by the British Academy of Sound Therapy – it’s reportedly the most relaxing song ever and was specifically created to help lower blood pressure, heart rate and reduce cortisol (the stress hormone). It’s an 8 minute track, and it’s recommended that you’re not driving while you listen to it. Maybe you can come back to this at the end of the chat and see what you think of it!
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:06 am
Clair eheadspace: Hey everyone, Clair here. Looking forward to hearing about peoples experiences and thoughts tonight.
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:06 am
Kristal eheadspace
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:07 am
Kristal eheadspace: And this is a direct link for that video too if you want to save it!
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:07 am
Kristal eheadspace: As usual a couple of things before we start:
*When you submit your question it won't appear straight away
*Our team will be busy reading and preparing an answer to your question before it's posted live - we appreciate your patience!
*If we can't publish anything we'll let you know (in a private message)
*It’s really helpful if you can identify yourself with your name, or an alias, as it means we can more easily recognise any follow up comments from you guys and make sure we’re answering the right person
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27th Aug, 11:08 am
Comment From Charlie (hY NRG)
Hey everyone at eheadspace!
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27th Aug, 11:08 am
Comment From honoree
hi guy. my name is Honoree. i'm a member of hynrg at headspace. i'm looking forward to hearing from you guys and to share my storied and to answer any question you might have for me
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
27th Aug, 11:08 am
Kristal eheadspace: Thanks for the questions so far - we're jhust working on some answers for you :)
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27th Aug, 11:08 am
Comment From Charlie (hY NRG)
Hey Honoree :-)
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27th Aug, 11:09 am
Comment From honoree
hi super man
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27th Aug, 11:09 am
Comment From Guest
H
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27th Aug, 11:09 am
Comment From Charlie (hY NRG)
Hey guest :-)
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27th Aug, 11:09 am
Comment From Stella
Hi, I'm Stella
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:09 am
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27th Aug, 11:10 am
Comment From Charlotte
How do you know if you have anxiety?
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:10 am
Clair eheadspace: There are a lot of different symptoms of anxiety, some people have a lot of symptoms and some have only a few. You can have some of these and not have anxiety too. Anxiety is only a problem if you feel like it’s a problem, if it’s stopping you from doing things you’d like to (or need to) or if it’s making you feel uncomfortable a lot.
The different areas where you might notice some symptoms include thoughts (negative thoughts or excessive worry), feelings (fear, stress, dread, panic or a sense of disconnection), physical sensations in your body (racing heart, butterflies in your tummy, tense muscles, dizziness, feeling tearful or angry), behaviours (nail biting, avoidance of people or situations etc), or even physical/health problems (tummy problems like constipation or diarrheoa and difficulty sleeping).
You can read more about signs of anxiety here -https://au.reachout.com/articles/what-is-anxiety.. and get some ideas of some starter things you can do to help manage anxiety symptoms -
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27th Aug, 11:11 am
Comment From Charlie (hY NRG)
Hey Stella !
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:11 am
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27th Aug, 11:11 am
Comment From Lou
Sometimes I just feel anxious for no reason. Those are the really hard times because I can’t plan for them and then I forget all the things I do to manage normally.
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
27th Aug, 11:11 am
Emma eheadspace: Hey Lou. :) You’re so right, anxiety can just pop up for no reason (or none that we can think of at the time). Sometimes when we think about it afterwards we can find a reason for why our brain suddenly thought there was danger! It sounds like you’ve already been having some support for anxiety? Or you’ve done some hard work by yourself to work out what helps? It can be really helpful to write down a list of reminders of the things that you know help, then you can keep that somewhere handy – maybe in your phone in the NOTES section? Maybe on a card in your wallet? Just somewhere that you usually have with you so you can access it easily. That way if you start to feel anxious you don’t have to think too much (cos it’s hard when your brain is focusing on everything but thinking clearly!), you just go to that list and then start doing the things that have worked well before. They might be things like going for a walk, deep breathing, phoning a friend or listening to music. Could be anything that relaxes or distracts you from the imposing negative thoughts that create anxious feelings in our bodies.
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27th Aug, 11:11 am
Comment From Beth
the link in the email took me to facebook so people may not be getting the right link
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
27th Aug, 11:11 am
Kristal eheadspace: Thanks for letting us know Beth - you're absolutely right, the link it's sending out is taking you to facebook! I'll try to let people know!
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27th Aug, 11:11 am
Comment From Stella
Thats exactly what I feel like basically all of the time :(
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:12 am
Kristal eheadspace: Stella - it can be really hard! Do you want to talk a little more about what you notice in your body??
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27th Aug, 11:12 am
Comment From Lucie
I get that anxiety is really common, but how come more people don’t know how to help when we’re having a panic attack or feeling really anxious? My mum can’t help me, and usually tells me just to get it together which doesn’t help at all!
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
27th Aug, 11:12 am
Rob eheadspace: Hello Lucie and thanks for the question. I think people find it hard to be helpful sometimes because they feel helpless. Most people have had some kind of personal anxiety before, and it’s highly likely that they felt powerless and out of control. That’s scary for people – especially for parents who usually really want to help, to protect us and to solve our problems for us. It can be helpful to chat with mum and tell her what you find helpful, the things you can do for yourself (so she can remind you of those) and the things that you find comforting from her. It’s also a good idea to let her know what you don’t find helpful – and hopefully she’s able to recognise when she does that. You might also want to explore this website with her – it’s an interactive program for childhood and adolescent anxiety – it’s free and also has programs available for parents -https://brave4you.psy.uq.edu.au/. Hope that helps!
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27th Aug, 11:13 am
Comment From Charlie (hY NRG)
Hey Charlotte. That’s a good question! I think most of us experience anxiety sometimes, although for some of us it can be more of a problem if it is so common and difficult it starts to get in the way of us doing the things we enjoy. I struggled with anxiety for nearly two years, before I spoke up and got help for it. Initially I would have anxiety in social scenarios, but was still able to go to uni and see my friends. When I started uni, and moved out of home, my anxiety piled up and it started preventing me from going to uni and doing the things I used to love like seeing my friends and being able to relax. A small amount of anxiety can help us, motivate us to face challenges, but if it overwhelms you, maybe you could consider chatting to a mental health clinician at eheadspace or in a headspace centre :-)
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27th Aug, 11:13 am
Comment From Charlie (hY NRG)
Hey Stella, I'm so sorry to hear you've been struggling with anxiety. I too struggle with anxiety, and I know how hard it is to speak about it, as it's hard to imagine who could possibly understand what we're feeling. There was a point where I felt my anxiety was consuming my thoughts all the time too! It can be really helpful to talk through these things with a counsellor or mental health clinician. I didn’t even consider talking to someone until my sister asked me if I would consider getting help. I was so relieved when the psychologist told me that so many other young people had similar problems, and that it was very treatable. I can now manage my anxiety, and whilst it comes up occasionally, it doesn’t get in the way of me doing the things I love. Have you considered talking to someone at eheadspace or in a headspace centre?
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27th Aug, 11:13 am
Comment From Julia
I don’t know how to keep up with my friends when so often I have to cancel plans because I’m too anxious to do them. I feel like I’ve been taken over completely by worry and anxiety and just cant be me anymore. It’s exhausting and stressful and no one understands at all.
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
27th Aug, 11:13 am
Kristal eheadspace: Hey Julia!
It sounds like you’ve been doing your best to keep going, it can be exhausting doing that – and often we forget to congratulate our self on our ability to keep on keeping on. It can be easy to forget that anxiety is a feeling, something we feel in our body and mind, not a personality. Anxiety is not you, and you are not anxiety. I know that’s hard to believe sometimes, but it can really help to try to remind ourselves of that. Your brain is being over protective, it’s trying to protect you and it’s doing it well. That’s our brain’s job, to protect our body – to make sure different systems are working together to keep you living. Anxiety is your brain being over protective, and while it’s hard to get your brain to realise that – it’s definitely possible!
While your brain is focused on keeping you alive, sometimes it’s hard to have the space to focus on socialising. I don’t know if you noticed it, but you said “so often” not “always” which shows me that there are times when you get to see your friends, that may not feel like a lot – but sometimes you’re able to get there! What is it about those times that makes it a bit easier? Can you reflect on what helps you get there? If you’re not already linked in with a counsellor it would be very helpful to do so, someone who can help your brain realise it’s being over protective where it doesn’t need to be.
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
27th Aug, 11:13 am
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27th Aug, 11:13 am
Comment From Joy
Hi everyone, I'm Joy, a Youth Advocate from headspace Chatswood. I'm excited to be joining the group this evening. I'm currently studying full time at uni and first came into contact with friends with Anxiety when I went to college. Some friends told me about being diagnosed with generalised anxiety disorder and their symptoms, stressors and how they coped. I guess I was wondering why some people are affected by anxiety and others aren't. And whether it's linked to certain personality types, cultural backgrounds and whether we might be able to self-diagnose anxiety? cheers
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
27th Aug, 11:13 am
Clair eheadspace: Welcome and thanks for your question Joy.
Anxiety does not discriminate by age, gender, sexuality or cultural background.
Generalized anxiety disorder, also known as GAD, is characterized by persistent, excessive, and unrealistic worry about everyday things. People with this disorder experience exaggerated worry and tension, often expecting the worst, even when there is no apparent reason for concern. They anticipate disaster and are overly concerned about money, health, family, work, or other issues. Sometimes just the thought of getting through the day produces anxiety. They don’t know how to stop the worry cycle and feel it is beyond their control, even though they usually realize that their anxiety is more intense than the situation warrants.
Anxiety, or general anxiety, is a normal reaction to stressful and uncertain situations. It’s your body telling you to stay alert and protect yourself.
I think that other parts of your question may have been answered in part, in the comments above.
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27th Aug, 11:14 am
Comment From Stella
Charlie- No I haven't. Do u suggest I do?
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27th Aug, 11:14 am
Comment From Jasmine
What should I do if I think I have anxiety?
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:14 am
Jody eheadspace: Hi Jasmin and Jasmine, It would be really helpful to speak to your GP. They can look at whether medication would be right for you and can refer you for some counselling. They will write up what is called a Mental Health Care Plan that entitles you to have up to 10 sessions with a mental health professional through Medicare. This counselling can be free or may incur a gap payment. This can be through a private psychologist or you could go to a Headspace Centre. There are also counsellors at school, TAFE and Uni who can also help.
Here are some resources that focus on anxiety Self help for anxiety (this is a pretty fun website) - http://youth.anxietybc.com/anxiety-101
Workbook style modules “what? Me worry!?!” - http://www.cci.health.wa.gov.au/resources/infopax.cfm?Info_ID=46
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27th Aug, 11:14 am
Comment From Beth
how can you explain to people you aren't being selfish or being rude when getting overwhelm in being large groups of people? especially when preferring to only hang out with certain people
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27th Aug, 11:14 am
Comment From Jasmin
How do I seek help for my anxiety and is there a way to cope with it myself
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:15 am
Rob eheadspace: Thanks for the question Beth. One of the more difficult parts to feeling the anxiety is trying to express it to others. Of course, since they are your friends and they are wanting to support you, you can explain to them that sometimes these situations can overwhelm you. It doesn’t mean it will happen, just that it can happen. It doesn’t have anything to do with them, it’s just something you feel from time to time. The way you deal with this feeling is to temporarily remove yourself so that you can recover and then re-join them. Who you want to hang out with is entirely up to you Beth.
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27th Aug, 11:15 am
Comment From Stella
Kristal - I get really shakey, I start to cry, I get really hot, I go red in the face and I just want to run away all of the time.
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
27th Aug, 11:15 am
Kristal eheadspace: That definitely sounds like anxiety Stella - I can see you've submitted another question which Sally is working on answering, so I won't say much for now. But it's great you're getting some support :)
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27th Aug, 11:15 am
Comment From Stella
I have been diagnosed with extreme anxiety by my psychologist and he doesn't want to medicate me because I am only 13, but I feel like I need to or else I'm going to have a mental breakdown.
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
27th Aug, 11:15 am
Sal eheadspace: hi stlla, it's great that you've been able to take the steps to get in touch with a psychologist and will have the opportunity to talk about what anxiety is for you and ways you can help to reduce the negative impact it may be having in your life.
Medical professionals won't prescribe medications to younger people with anxiety . The general rule is to start with talking therapies for all sorts of reasons.
I can hear that you might be thinking that medication would be a really quick and easy way to control anxiety but in the long run talking things through and getting to the underlying causes will be what the aim is.
It's also important that you know it's ok to talk these things through with you GP or psychologist so they can further explain their treatment plans and help you to understand what the best plan of treatment will be and why :)
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27th Aug, 11:15 am
Comment From Charlie (hY NRG)
Hey Lou. I can TOTALLY relate to what you said about dropping all the things you do to manage when your anxiety comes up. I am so good at practicing self-care when I am going well, and then when my anxiety comes up I drop all of the things that make me feel good! It’s the worst when you feel like you’re anxious for no reason. I used to get so frustrated when my friends would ask me why I was so anxious, but I couldn’t explain why. It helped me to think of anxiety as any other medical problem, sometimes there isn’t a reason we can see, but with the right support and help we can get better and back on track. I am slowly getting better at recognising when my anxiety is starting to flare up, and reminding myself to do yoga, mindfulness meditation go for runs, and see my friends (all things that make me feel good!)
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27th Aug, 11:15 am
Comment From Charlie (hY NRG)
Hey Stella, if you feel your anxiety is worrying you, it could really help to talk to a mental health counsellor about it, and I would definitely recommend it !! I remember thinking there’s no way anyone could understand this… (and I was so scared to go in). I have never felt so relieved as I did after my first session though. it’s also important to remember that speaking to a counsellor doesn’t mean we are really unwell, it’s ok and really helpful to do so even if you just haven’t been feeling yourself for a little while. Would you feel comfortable speaking to a counsellor on eheadspace or in a headspace centre? If you jump on the headspace website you can see where the nearest centres is to you.
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27th Aug, 11:16 am
Comment From honoree
i'm no psychic but i feel like there might be someone out there feeling too scared to writ a question or comment. dont be afraid. this is a safe space to get some answers on what you might be feeling and share your story . it might help others. thank you
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:16 am
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:16 am
Kristal eheadspace: Absolutely Honoree!! We love questions :)
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27th Aug, 11:16 am
Comment From Emily
We’ve just had our first baby, it’s been 6 weeks of very little sleep and I’m feeling so worried all the time. I’m not sure if that’s from lack of sleep or if it’s because I feel so scared to do something wrong. I’ve never felt like this before and it’s pretty scary. My partner is worried too, we don’t have much family support here and none of my friends have kids, so it’s feeling lonely.
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
27th Aug, 11:18 am
Clair eheadspace: Congratulations on the birth of your baby, that’s very exciting news.
Understandably, you’ve got a lot on your mind, and it may feel a little scary, and physically and emotionally tiring at the moment.
Anxiety and worry about parenting is a very normal thing… and these feelings can feel even worse when you are sleep deprived, which is very likely with a newborn baby.
Keeping in mind that being a parent is pretty stressful, there are many things that you can do to manage everyday situations that are causing you stress.
Here are a couple of ideas:
- Be aware of what is normal behaviour for a baby/child of that age… your expectations will then be more realistic that way. There is lots of information available online through websites like http://raisingchildren.net.au/or https://www.parentline.com.au/ Your Maternal and Child Health Nurse will be able to explain what is age appropriate too.
- Give yourself time to calm down before you respond to a situation. As long as bubs is safe, take a minute to gather your thoughts and think about how you want to respond. A baby’s cries are a way of communicating their needs, but it takes a while to work out their language, so trouble shoot the basics first. Maybe bubs has a wet or dirty nappy, is hungry or just wants a cuddle. Remember, you can’t spoil and newborn and sometimes they just want to be close to you.
- Try to focus on what is important at the time. Focus on your baby’s needs and your needs first… the washing or the dishes can wait until a little later.
- Keep in mind that there are lots of opinions about parenting and people like to share those…. while well meaning, what your mum or grandma did when you were a baby, may not be relevant for you. Speaking to professional may be a better option.
It’s really important to take care of yourself in general. As a general rule, when mum is happy, baby is happy.
- Try to sleep when you can… I know it’s hard, but it will get easier.
- Be kind to yourself. Parenting is a really tough job, so ask for help when you need it and draw on all of your resources. Call a friend, family member or speak to your partner if you just want to chat to someone. Great support is also available through your local Maternal Child Health Nurse, your GP or Parentline https://www.parentline.com.au/ If you have concerns about your baby’s wellbeing or your wellbeing do not hesitate to speak to someone.
- Try to get social with other young parents. Chatting with other parents who are in a similar situation may be helpful. You can share stories, offer ideas and maybe even make some new friends. There are lots of options available:
+ Young Parent Groups (try your local council to find out what is available in your area)
+ Activity and educational groups through your local health nurse
If you feel as though the anxiety is getting too much for you to manage, please seek the support you need. It might be a good idea to chat with your GP or your Health Nurse about your worries.
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:18 am
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:18 am
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:20 am
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27th Aug, 11:20 am
Comment From Charlie (hY NRG)
Hey Lucie, I’m really sorry to hear you’ve been struggling with anxiety and panic attacks. Panic attacks are the worst!! I have had them too, and my mum actually responded the same way when I told her what was happening. It can be hard because when our parents were our age, mental health wasn’t very well understood, and so I find myself and most of my friends understand mental health much better than our parents do. Is there a friend or another family member you think you could trust to talk about anxiety? Do you have any strategies that help you when you start to feel panic? I found it really helpful talking to a counsellor, they helped me with a set of steps to take when my panic attacks would come up. It’s so frustrating though when our parents don’t get it :(
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:20 am
Kristal eheadspace: This video explains more about anxiety
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:20 am
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27th Aug, 11:21 am
Comment From Charlie (hY NRG)
Hey Joy from Chatswood!! welcome to the chat :-)
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:21 am
Kristal eheadspace: I'm sure that we will talk about mindfulness at some point - it's one of the best strategies to build into your daily routine as it's very helpful for anxiety. These videos talk more about it :)
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:21 am
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:21 am
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27th Aug, 11:21 am
Comment From Paisley
Hello! Whenever at school at lunchtime I feel so anxious. I can't eat in front of people, I can never ever. I hate watching other people eat, I always had to go to the toilets to eat my food, away from people I don't know why but I can't.
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
27th Aug, 11:22 am
Emma eheadspace: Hi Paisley. I can understand why you are feeling so anxious about not wanting to eat in front of people and or watching other people eat given that food is just such a huge part of our social culture.
If you are like most people with a fear of eating, your level of anxiety probably escalates in proportion to how difficult the food is to eat. Foods that are cumbersome or require utensils such as salads, soup, and dishes with sauces are usually the most anxiety-provoking. And potentially messy foods will be more anxiety-provoking, because there is a greater likelihood of embarrassment while eating. Finger foods are usually least threatening so maybe give smaller bite sized items a go in your lunch box.
Here is a really great link relating to anxiety around eat that might be worth you having a look over, as treatment for this anxiety is quite varied depending on how sever your experience and anxiety.
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27th Aug, 11:22 am
Comment From Charlie (hY NRG)
Stella, that sounds like anxiety and I certainly know those feelings! It's really brave of you for joining this chat and looking into things that can help. My psychologist was able to explain these feelings to me, and I now have a bunch of strategies when those feelings come up. Panic and anxiety are absolutely treatable and it will get better with help!! Good on you for speaking up. headspace is here for you :-)
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27th Aug, 11:22 am
Comment From Paisley
Does anyone know any ways to keep calm? I'm always just lashing out at people all the time, I just want to scream at the smallest things, I've tried taking deep breaths and everything but I just always end up getting worked up and angry over the smallest things ):
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
27th Aug, 11:22 am
Jody eheadspace: Hi Paisley, Breathing is a good way to try and calm yourself, however it might be helpful to try and identify your triggers for getting angry and removing yourself from stressful situations if you feel yourself losing control. Anger is usually a reaction to something else you are feeling such as sadness, embarrassment or hurt. Here is a link on managing anger that might be helpful https://au.reachout.com/articles/how-to-deal-with-anger
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27th Aug, 11:22 am
Comment From jasmin
how do you go about asking your gp for help? im scared i'll look dumb because anxiety is something everyone can experience
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
27th Aug, 11:22 am
Sal eheadspace: Hi Jasmin, anxiety is something everyone can experience, just like the flu or a virus, or a broken bone. see where I'm going :). It's also something that may require support to recover from, ..like the flu or a broken bone and that's exactly what the GP is for. They are there ti help you find the right treatment for what's stopping you from functioning at your full potential at that time.
The GP is not going to think you are dumb for being proactive and help seeking for legitimate support. They will however be able to provide you with a referral to a counsellor or a psychologist for further support.
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:23 am
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27th Aug, 11:23 am
Comment From Victoria
Hey everyone, I just am feeling super stuck, I've been seeing a psychologist for a while and have now tried 2 medications and my anxiety just seems to continue to get worse. I'm having multiple panic attacks a day and cant eat or sleep or get anything productive done for uni, I'm incredibly behind and too scared to got to class 95% of the time. Im just really struggling to see this getting better because it just keeps getting worse but I'm trying all the things I've been told to do? I just am feeling completely demoralised does anyone have any tips on trying to keep hopeful when nothing seems to be helping at the moment? sorry for the ramble, just feeling quite stuck?
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
27th Aug, 11:23 am
Rob eheadspace: Hi Victoria, that does sound like quite a frustrating and overwhelming situation. That’s great that you are seeing a psychologist about how you’ve been feeling and trying some of their ideas including medication. It does sound like it isn’t quite having the desired effect though. In this circumstance it’s really important to keep the dialogue going with your psychologist and GP. If the medication isn’t having the desired effect, then exploring alternatives would be the way to go. After all, the medication is supposed to help, not make it worse. This is similar to the talking therapy with the psychologist. It may be that a different strategy, or even a referral to a different therapist may be beneficial.
Similarly, if at the moment university is something that seems too difficult to do right now, perhaps an option of taking leave would help, so that you can focus on recovery. This also requires some dialogue with your teachers so they are aware of your current difficulties and can help work with you on what to do next.
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27th Aug, 11:24 am
Comment From Jackson
My brother has OCD and I’d like to know more about it. I know it’s an anxiety disorder (which makes sense because my dad has pretty bad anxiety). What causes OCD and does my brother really believe some of the irrational things he’s afraid of?
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:24 am
Kristal eheadspace: We don’t know exactly what causes OCD yet :/
We do know that it can run in families. Researchers are actively searching genetic variations that may help explain why one person gets OCD and another does not. Genes are not the whole story, though: even identical twins, who have identical genetic material, can differ, with one having OCD and the other not.
Environmental causes of OCD are also not clear. Some cases, especially among children, may be related to an autoimmune reaction to infection, though this remains unclear in most instances. Stressful life events can cause symptoms to appear or to worsen; it is not clear whether they actually cause OCD in a susceptible person, or whether they just worsen or amplify a condition that was already there. Hormonal fluctuations may also influence OCD; onset is common during adolescence, and some women report symptoms worsening with their menstrual cycle or around the time of pregnancy.
Most people with OCD are well aware that their obsessions and compulsions are irrational. Indeed, this is part of the torment of OCD – their insight does little to weaken the obsessional distress or to make compulsive behaviors easier to resist, and the understanding that these thoughts and behaviors are irrational heightens the distress. This can lead to a high degree of shame, embarrassment, and isolation.
The emotional areas of the brain are making the person feel as if, for example, their hands are contaminated with deadly germs, or that they may have accidentally hit someone with their car, or that they left the iron on and their house might burn down as a result. The distress that arises doesn’t stop until they perform their compulsive behaviors of (respectively) perhaps scrubbing their hands with soap and hot water, or retracing the entire route they just drove checking for a struck pedestrian, or driving back home to check that the iron is off.
I know that probably seems like we know hardly anything about OCD - but we do know that there's some good treatment options. Is your brother having support at all Jackson?
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:24 am
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27th Aug, 11:25 am
Comment From Charlie (hY NRG)
Stella, this podcast really helped me with some strategies to manage panic attacks and the awful feelings that come up when my anxiety would get really bad. This helped me so much to understand how I could let the feelings pass, rather than trying to escape the feelings - let me know what you think!
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27th Aug, 11:25 am
Comment From Charlie (hY NRG)
Exactly honoree! So true. These things are so hard to talk about, but when I did, I realised 4 of my closest friends were experiencing similar struggles. We were all struggling together in silence! Remember, even if you feel like you're alone and the only one, it's likely that so many others around you are experiencing similar anxiety
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27th Aug, 11:25 am
Comment From Paisley
Thank you Emma! ut up my fruits and vegetables whenever I eat, it's just that I don't feel comfortable and I didn't know what's Wrong with me, I'll have a look in the link
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:25 am
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27th Aug, 11:25 am
Comment From Jackson
Does anxiety really get better with treatment??
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:25 am
Sal eheadspace: Hi Jackson,
Success of treatment varies, but most people with an anxiety disorder can be helped with professional care. Benefits of CBT (cognitive behavioural therapy) are usually seen in 12 to 16 weeks.
Medication may be a short-term or long-term treatment option, depending on severity of symptoms, other medical conditions and individual circumstances. It often takes time and patience to find the drug that works best for you. Treatment may be complicated if you have more than one anxiety disorder or if they suffer from depression, substance abuse, or other co-existing conditions. This is why treatment must be tailored specifically for each person and why getting support in person is most helpful.
So even though it can feel really anxiety provoking to get support in person, there is lots of evidence to show us that it’s worth the effort!
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27th Aug, 11:26 am
Comment From Arabella
My sister is 14 and often gets out of going to school because she’s sick, but I don’t think she’s really sick. Weve talked a bit and I know she has problems with some friends at school and I think it’s because she doesn’t know how to deal with them. I know that anxiety often can make you feel physically ill and I’ve talked to mum about it and she agrees, but we don’t know how to help my sister. What would you suggest?
eheadspace Moderator
Moderator
27th Aug, 11:28 am
Kristal eheadspace: Hi Arabella :) (lovely name!)
It sounds as though you and mum have a pretty good idea of what might be going on. It’s really important though to make sure there’s nothing physically wrong – has your sister had a check up with the dr? It also sounds lke you and mum really want to be supportive which is exactly what she needs.
If this is related to being anxious one of the worst things for your sister is to avoid school. The more she avoids it, the harder it will be to go back, mainly because she will really start to feel disconnected from the other kids, the teachers, and the routine in general. Avoidance feels good in the short term, but it actually sends anxiety through the roof. Having said that, I know how difficult it can be to get a 14 year old to do something that they’ve decided not to do.
One of the most important things you and mum can do to help is to help her understands why she’s feeling like she’s feeling (if there’s nothing physically wrong when she has a check up). The reason she’s feeling sick is likely because of anxiety. One of the things that will help her is if she can understand exactly why her anxiety feels the way it does. It will help her to stop getting ‘anxious about the anxiety’. Anxiety feels awful and it’s that physical feeling of anxiety that tends to take over from the feared thing. Here is an article that explains it: https://www.heysigmund.com/sunroom/a-beautiful-mind/ If you can explain this to her and let her know why it’s happening it will help her to push through it. The language is written maybe for younger kids but the gist of it is relevant for everyone – just relay it to her in a language that will feel right for her, otherwise let her read it but explain that even though it’s written for younger kids, the concept is relevant for everyone, including adults and adolescents.
If she’s missing school, it would be really important for her to get some sort of counselling support. She might prefer to go to a counsellor outside of school, to avoid the other kids knowing about it. In the meantime, here are some things that will help her to manage it:
. Anxiety: Ways to Feel Better Without Medication https://www.heysigmund.com/sunroom/a-beautiful-mind/
. Managing Anxiety: 8 Proven Ways. https://www.heysigmund.com/managing-anxiety/
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:28 am
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27th Aug, 11:29 am
Comment From Charlie (hY NRG)
Hey Jackson, I have struggled with OCD in the past and I find most people don’t understand it very well! It’s really nice of you that you’re learning more about it so that you can empathise with your brother and understand how hard it is for him. OCD like many mental health (and physical health) issues, it’s not as important to understand why the problem is there as to understand how the person can get better! OCD was so scary for me because I had never heard it spoken about, I thought I was going ‘mad’! As my OCD got worse, so did my anxiety. I knew my OCD worries and intrusive irrational thoughts were stupid and not worth thinking twice about, but for some reason I had to do everything I could to make sure they weren’t true. It’s really the worst feeling! The good news is OCD is very treatable and there is lots of help out there. Headspace is a great place for your brother to start!
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27th Aug, 11:29 am
Comment From honoree
i've been going through some issues with my family lately. my parents are no on good terms. due to this i've been having dreams fighting with my dad almost every night. i wake up feeling so sad and tired like i was in a real fight. i'm not sure what to maake of it
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:29 am
Sal eheadspace: Honoree, I'm sorry to hear things are a sounding pretty hard for you right now. It certainly sounds like you've got a lot on your mind and it's doing a bit f overtime while you're asleep!
Hey, I guess this is where you might like to take advantage of a bit of self care and relaxation time( before sleep will be good) doing some really nice stress release exercises and putting yourself in a calmer state before sleep might help towards a more restful night
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:29 am
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27th Aug, 11:30 am
Comment From Charlie (hY NRG)
And to your second question Jackson, about 3 years ago I had to stop my uni course because my anxiety was so bad and I never thought it was going to leave me alone. I honestly thought I would never feel myself again. It took me about a year working with a psychologist (and in my case it was necessary to work with a psychiatrist, but that’s not always the case). Today my anxiety comes and goes occasionally but it really doesn’t get in the way. So I am a big believer that it gets better with treatment!
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27th Aug, 11:30 am
Comment From Elle
How can I manage a panic attack?
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:30 am
Jody eheadspace: Hi Elle, Here is a great link to panic attacks. it explains what a panic attack is and the symptoms and how to manage them ( relaxation techniques, exercise, distraction, slow breathing and positive self talk) https://au.reachout.com/articles/what-are-panic-attacks
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:30 am
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27th Aug, 11:30 am
Comment From honoree
thank you Sal. that will help for sure
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27th Aug, 11:30 am
Comment From Beth
where do phobias come from/ are they caused by anxiety? I have a few phobias which have left me in an absolute panic when encountering them. is there a certain way to get rid of them?
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:31 am
Emma eheadspace: Hi Beth. Great question.
Millions of people experience debilitating levels of anxiety, with phobias being the most common anxiety disorder. And there are soooo many things that people can develop phobias about....which often result in traumatic anxiety symptoms.
Sometimes it is really easy to figure out why you are afraid of something, as an obvious experience has occurred. But other times it can be unclear because it can be the result from a combination of factors, such as genetic predisposition, an association, something your have observed or something you have learnt from someone else, or a mix of more than one of these factors.
Getting rid of phobia's is usually possible with the right treatment, and these treatments are very similar no matter what the fear. There are several ways to treat phobias including confronting the fear, formal exposure therapy, thought and emotion control (CBT) therapy being he most common. Here is a link to explain these treatments in more detail.
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27th Aug, 11:31 am
Comment From Anne
Hi, ive tried to focus on my breathing when i am anxious but it more often than not makes my heart start beatng faster. Is this normal?
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:31 am
Rob eheadspace: Hello Anne and thank you for that question. As you’ve experienced anxiety can have a physical effect on us. For a lot of people it can increase our heart rate, respiratory rate, blood pressure, even make it difficult to think and concentrate. When we do try to focus on our breathing it allows us to control it greater, by consciously slowing it down. It does take a while for our body to catch up with this, and since we are more focused we notice our heart rate more too. So it’s definitely a natural occurrence, and especially since you are feeling anxious at the time it’s understandable that it would cause some distress. But with continued effort it should then begin to subside.
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:31 am
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27th Aug, 11:31 am
Comment From Beth
I was given Valium to help when having an MRI but it didn't seem to calm me down, why is this?
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:31 am
Kristal eheadspace: Hey Beth, I'm not sure if that was the first time you tried Valium? Sometimes, and this seems weird, people can have the opposite reaction to it. So instead of it calming you down, it can actually make you feel a bit hyper. Was that what happened for you??
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:32 am
Emma eheadspace: This gorgeous little video uses 'Inside Out' to explain anxiety and depression. I love this movie and how it so clearly helps us to understand what goes on in our minds and body. So cute and so helpful.
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:32 am
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27th Aug, 11:32 am
Comment From Guest
Im not sure whether i have anxiety but i always freak out over little things and i back out of doing really important things
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:32 am
Sal eheadspace: Hi there, it sounds like there might things you find a little anxiety provoking? If you feel like something is important, but something prevents you from attending to it it may be that you're falling into a habit of avoidant behaviour. It's a pretty common way we try to stop from doing things that make us feel uncomfortable, like anxiety.
If this is having a an impact on your daily life and stopping you form doing things that are important to you I'd really encourage you to have a talk with your GP
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27th Aug, 11:32 am
Comment From Beth
It didn't really make me hyper but I still had those anxious feelings while in the scan
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:32 am
Kristal eheadspace: Ahh ok Beth - so maybe in y our case the does wasn't strong enough. Valium can be prescribed in a number of strengths, often drs start with a low dose to see how your body responds to it. It's likely that your does wasn't quite strong enough!
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27th Aug, 11:33 am
Comment From Macie
Hey guys! I'm Macie, nice to meet you. What can you do if your constantly worrying about your future. I can't stop thinking about mine and how much I want to be perfect and gett good grades etc
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:33 am
Clair eheadspace: Hi Macie, thanks for logging on to chat with us tonight…. And what a great question. I work in a school too and hear this question all the time.
It’s easy to get really caught up with the chatter in our heads, or that of the people around us about grades, goals and the future… and what feels initially motivating, can sometimes lead to anxiety.
Aiming for great grades can show that you are motivated and have a good work ethic, but when our tendency is towards perfectionism, we can set our standards too high, and they can often not be met… or at least without great struggle or stress and anxiety.
What we do know is, that rather than focussing on goals or grades, if you follow your interests, you are far more likely to enjoy your studies, be successful and chose a career path that you’ll enjoy and keep you motivated. So, if you choose the subjects and extra-curricular activities that really interest you…. outcomes will likely be positive. Listen to the thoughts and knowledge of those around you, but don’t be distracted by their goals and motivations, it’s so important that these come from you.
If you feel as though your thoughts about the future and high standards are starting to become a problem, it might be worth checking in with your school counsellor.
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:33 am
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27th Aug, 11:33 am
Comment From Janelle
I often find myself getting anxious about my anxiety, like I worry that I might be too anxious to do something and then I get so worried about maybe getting anxious that I then can’t do what I planned to do. I totally “get” that worrying about worrying isn’t helpful but I don’t know how to deal with that. Any tips?
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:33 am
Emma eheadspace: Hi Janelle. Yes you are right, it is not unusual for people to become increasingly anxious about their anxiety experiences. I think that it is really great to go back to the basics of dealing with the anxiety. Being able to identify your triggers in advance will help you to manage situations that might make you anxious as well as manage your anxiety symptoms. The more aware you become of your own body and mind and why it is functioning the way it is, the more you will be able to learn to management yourself more confidently.
For example situations that you feel are high stress and likely to cause anxiety, you can learn to support yourself better by preparing for the best outcome. Supporting yourself might include things like having a support person with you, practicing deep breathing, planning ahead, allowing adequate time and lowering your expectations of yourself.
It can also be really helpful to limit your negative self-talk around anxiety. Should you find yourself predicting the future with anxiety as a part of this then maybe it is time to practice some mindfulness and bring yourself back to a more positive mindset. Mindfulness is about training your brain to pay attention in a specific way. When you are mindful you focus on the present moment, not thinking about the past or guessing the future. Mindfulness is a way of bringing us back to experience life as it happens.
Here is a link that will tell you all about it.https://au.reachout.com/articles/how-to-practise-mindfulness
There is also an app that you can get on your phone called SMILING MIND. It is free and specifically designed for young people. It only takes about 10 minutes and it's a bit like a mediation... it is great. Heaps of young people love it. Maybe give that a go for a few weeks. The more you do it the better you get at training your brain to be focused in the present and in turn your body will also become more relaxed.
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27th Aug, 11:34 am
Comment From Charlie (hY NRG)
I think it's a really common anxiety, Macie! I find it so hard not to worry about the future, especially when there are big things coming up in life. It's very common to worry about school grades etc. The reality is, no one is perfect!! Especially at school. I always used to put lots of pressure on myself to succeed at school and it caused me so much anxiety. I wish I had understood at school what I could do for myself to clear my head and relax! Do you have any hobbies? Or is there something you enjoy doing where you forget about everything else going on? For example I love doing yoga, going to the beach with my dog and playing soccer with my mates is a really good way to clear my mind.
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:34 am
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27th Aug, 11:34 am
Comment From Anne
Hi rob, thanks for your response. Even when i am not anxious and i practise breathing techniques (such as focusing on my breathing or trying to slow my breath down) i find that this will still increase my heart rate. Should i still continue to practice breathing techniques?
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:34 am
Rob eheadspace: I see, so in this instance it could be that the body is having more oxygenated blood introduced into the system that would then create an increase in our heart rate. Especially if you were practicing this while in a normal resting heart rate, rather than from an increased anxiety effected heart rate. I think you should still continue to practice these techniques for the situations that you do feel anxious. Charlie also has some great info on mindfulness meditation in his answer.
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27th Aug, 11:34 am
Comment From Charlie (hY NRG)
Hi Anne, it can be really scary when feelings of anxiety and panic come up especially when we are in social scenarios or at work and obviously just want them to be gone! What has really helped me a LOT is mindfulness meditation. Have you tried mindfulness at all? It’s all about observing what’s happening in the body and accepting those feelings. My psychologist told me that feelings of panic will always end after a few minutes, but if I resist them they can last longer. Learning to let the feelings ‘wash over me’ was so helpful. There are some really helpful mindfulness apps like smiling mind - have you heard of that one?
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:34 am
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27th Aug, 11:34 am
Comment From Diana
Last year during our school exams I felt so worried and like I couldn’t think properly. My mum said I might have anxiety, but it’s not a problem any more. Can you just get it when you’re worried about specific stuff?
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:34 am
Jody eheadspace: Hi Diana, It sounded like you had some anxious feelings/ worries about the exams and when the exams passed your feelings passed. This is a bit different from anxiety. Anxiety doesn’t go away when the stressful situation has passed. So would still be feeling anxious after your exams had finished if you had anxiety. Everyone feels anxious from time to time but for someone experiencing anxiety it is much more difficult to control these feelings and can happen at any time.
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27th Aug, 11:34 am
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27th Aug, 11:35 am
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27th Aug, 11:35 am
Comment From Joy
Thanks very much Clair! and thanks for the welcome Charlie! A follow up question would be: what is the best way to help a friend who has anxiety? Assuming of course that you're reasonably close and are comfortable talking openly with them. Do you keep their anxiety at the back of your mind? Also I've noticed my friends with anxiety have a certain tendency to think deeply about things and to want things done a specific way to cater for them. Are these behaviours associated with their anxiety and can they learn to overcome their symptoms over time?
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:36 am
Clair eheadspace: Thanks for your comment and questions Joy. We will soon be closing the chat, but I think you’ll find that these questions have been covered in the comments above. You may also find these past group chats helpful.
What is a young person doesn’t want help:
Recognising warning signs and learning how to support young people:
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:36 am
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27th Aug, 11:36 am
Comment From Em
I’ve been bullied at school and I’m really wanting to try home school because its so hard to go back there. My mum forces me to go to school everyday but I always feel so sick. I’m worried that there’s something wrong with me but I’ve seen my dr and apparently theres nothing wrong. She thinks I might have anxiety and told me to see someone at headspace. How do I do that?
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:36 am
Rob eheadspace: That must be a pretty frustrating situation. Getting in touch with your local Headspace Centre is as easy as calling them up on the phone. Either you or your mother can call them to make an appointment. You can even go there in person to make an appointment, which can sometimes be a bit more helpful because then you get to see the place before you have your first appointment. Either way you choose the staff there will help you with getting everything sorted for your first appointment and then help you with how you’ve been feeling. If you put your suburb or postcode into this it will tell you the details of the centre nearest to you.
It’s also important to let someone at school know about what’s been going on, to make sure that any bullying that’s going on does not continue, as this may then help with the feeling you have about school.
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:37 am
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27th Aug, 11:37 am
Comment From Charlie (hY NRG)
Omg Janelle I know what you mean - "worry about worry!". Worrying is the worst feeling, so it's natural for a worrier to worry about it!! One thing I learnt that really helped was not to fear my worry, but in fact to welcome it. I know it can't help me, although it can be a little uncomfortable. With time, the more we welcome it and get used to it being with us, it lessens. Have you tried chatting to an eheadspace counsellor or coming into a headspace centre? The mental health clinicians there have helped so many of my friends manage and cope with their anxiety!
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27th Aug, 11:37 am
Comment From Charlie (hY NRG)
Hey guest, I can totally relate to the feeling of needing to back out when important things come up. One thing I learnt is that when I avoid the things that make me most anxious, over time this actually makes my anxiety worse (even though in the short term, it relieved my anxiety). My psychologist helped me build up my confidence with some relaxation techniques, and I faced my anxieties gradually bit by bit. It might really help to have a counsellor at headspace support you in this! It helped me so much
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27th Aug, 11:37 am
Comment From Macie
Yes! My hobbies are that I really love creative designs and business, it's really fun. I try to focus on the good things in life, I study and excerise and I like for Kasparov things in a schedule it may sound crazy but I have certain times to do things! Thanks for asking Charlie
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:37 am
Sal eheadspace: hey there, it can be difficult to pin down all the different aspects of anxiety and how it can impact on our lives. Sometimes it may present as a tendency to jump towards negative outcomes :(
If you are preoccupies with working through all the possible outcomes and you're anxious, that anxiety will work through the most negative filter in order to keep you away from danger. Thus, the negative outcome.
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27th Aug, 11:37 am
Comment From Hazel
My dr has recommended that I take benzos for my anxiety but I’m really worried about that (ha, another worry) because I know they can be addictive. Are there non medication options? I’m getting a referral to a psychologist but are there things I can do now?
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:37 am
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:38 am
Emma eheadspace: Hi Hazel.
I am not able to answer you in full because we are coming to the end of your chat, but I would definitely read through this chat as there have been a lot of great ideas and suggestions for non medication treatments. It will be great to take some of this knowledge into your psychologist to discuss how to use them in your everyday life and how they might help you.
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27th Aug, 11:38 am
Comment From Macie
See you guys and thanks for the help! I hope everyone is feeling well x
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:38 am
Sal eheadspace: Thanks for all your input tonight guys.
bye now Sally
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27th Aug, 11:38 am
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27th Aug, 11:38 am
Comment From honoree
thanks everyone. bey
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27th Aug, 11:38 am
Comment From Charlie (hY NRG)
Thanks so much for Joining macie! Stay strong and don't forget to treat yo-self (hehe that's what we say at headspace when we talk about self-care)
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27th Aug, 11:38 am
Comment From Charlie (hY NRG)
Thanks so much for joining everyone, it was great chatting! See you in the next group chat :-)
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:39 am
Emma eheadspace: Awesome chat guys...packed with some really useful info. Bye.
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:44 am
Rob eheadspace: Cya later everyone!
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27th Aug, 11:44 am
Jody eheadspace: thanks everyone! Bye!!!
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:49 am
Kristal eheadspace: Thank you so much everyone for joining us tonight – it’s felt really fast paced on our end! You had some great questions, and it’s so nice to see you all actively taking steps to get more supports in place!
Here are some more resources that might be helpful to check out!
RESOURCES
(This has some good strategies such as progressive muscle relaxation, deep breathing and thought challenging)
General anxiety information for 18 – 25 year olds - http://www.cyh.com/healthtopics/healthtopicdetails.aspx?p=240&np=298&id=2008
Self help for anxiety (this is a pretty fun website) - http://youth.anxietybc.com/anxiety-101
This is an interactive program for childhood and adolescent anxiety – it’s free and also has programs available for parents -https://brave4you.psy.uq.edu.au/
Overcoming anxiety: how, why and what – the power of mindfulness - https://www.heysigmund.com/overcoming-anxiety-mindfulness/
The second brain – the impact of our gut on anxiety https://www.heysigmund.com/our-second-brain-and-stress-anxiety-depression-mood/
Some funny comics to laugh at ourselves (when we can) over some of the things our anxious mind does to us - https://www.upworthy.com/12-funny-comics-that-might-help-you-feel-a-bit-less-anxious-today?c=ufb2
Apps
the worry box (gives you a list of coping statements to help you reframe your thoughts) – android
Kristal eheadspace: Thank you so much everyone for joining us tonight – it’s felt really fast paced on our end! You had some great questions, and it’s so nice to see you all actively taking steps to get more supports in place! https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.excelatlife.worrybox
Here are some more resources that might be helpful to check out!
eheadspace Moderator
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27th Aug, 11:49 am